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  • Baldini et al QSR 2020 - revised manuscript Author accepted manuscript

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Quaternary Science Reviews. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Quaternary Science Reviews, 254, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.quascirev.2020.106784

    Accepted author manuscript, 6.64 MB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 7/01/22

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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Detecting and quantifying palaeoseasonality in stalagmites using geochemical and modelling approaches

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
  • J.U.L. Baldini
  • F.A. Lechleitner
  • S.F.M. Breitenbach
  • J. van Hunen
  • L.M. Baldini
  • P.M. Wynn
  • R.A. Jamieson
  • H.E. Ridley
  • A.J. Baker
  • I.W. Walczak
  • J. Fohlmeister
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Article number106784
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>15/02/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>Quaternary Science Reviews
Volume254
Number of pages27
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date7/01/21
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Stalagmites are an extraordinarily powerful resource for the reconstruction of climatological palaeoseasonality. Here, we provide a review of different types of seasonality preserved by stalagmites and methods for extracting this information. A new drip classification scheme is introduced, which facilitates the identification of stalagmites fed by seasonally responsive drips and which highlights the wide variability in drip types feeding stalagmites. This hydrological variability, combined with seasonality in Earth atmospheric processes, meteoric precipitation, biological processes within the soil, and cave atmosphere composition means that every stalagmite retains a different and distinct (but correct) record of environmental conditions. Replication of a record is extremely useful but should not be expected unless comparing stalagmites affected by the same processes in the same proportion. A short overview of common microanalytical techniques is presented, and suggested best practice discussed. In addition to geochemical methods, a new modelling technique for extracting meteoric precipitation and temperature palaeoseasonality from stalagmite δ18O data is discussed and tested with both synthetic and real-world datasets. Finally, world maps of temperature, meteoric precipitation amount, and meteoric precipitation oxygen isotope ratio seasonality are presented and discussed, with an aim of helping to identify regions most sensitive to shifts in seasonality. © 2021 Elsevier Ltd

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Quaternary Science Reviews. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Quaternary Science Reviews, 254, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.quascirev.2020.106784