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Dissociative and metacognitive factors in hallucination-proneness when controlling for comorbid symptoms

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Dissociative and metacognitive factors in hallucination-proneness when controlling for comorbid symptoms. / Varese, Filippo; Barkus, Emma; Bentall, Richard P.

In: Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, Vol. 16, No. 3, 05.2011, p. 193-217.

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Varese F, Barkus E, Bentall RP. Dissociative and metacognitive factors in hallucination-proneness when controlling for comorbid symptoms. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry. 2011 May;16(3):193-217. doi: 10.1080/13546805.2010.495244

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Varese, Filippo ; Barkus, Emma ; Bentall, Richard P. / Dissociative and metacognitive factors in hallucination-proneness when controlling for comorbid symptoms. In: Cognitive Neuropsychiatry. 2011 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 193-217.

Bibtex

@article{d31b8c76e4fd47a8b6c50eda65bfb952,
title = "Dissociative and metacognitive factors in hallucination-proneness when controlling for comorbid symptoms",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: Recent studies have linked hallucination-proneness to dysfunctional metacognitive beliefs, dissociation, and disrupted capacity to discriminate between internal and external cognitive events (reality discrimination). This study addressed a number of methodological limitations of previous research by investigating the relationship between hallucination-proneness and the aforementioned variables while controlling for comorbid symptoms.METHOD: A large sample of nonclinical participants was screened on measures of hallucination-proneness, cognitive intrusions, paranoid ideation, metacognitive beliefs, and dispositional mindfulness (including measures of dissociation-like experiences). In addition, a signal detection task was used to investigate reality discrimination in four subgroups of participants selected on the basis of their scores on hallucination-proneness and intrusions.RESULTS: Regression analyses for the self-report data were conducted to investigate the predictors of hallucination-proneness and paranoia when controlling for comorbid symptoms. Also, between-group differences on the behavioural data were tested to determine whether perturbed reality discrimination is specifically associated with hallucination-proneness rather than cognitive intrusions. Results revealed that metacognitive beliefs are more strongly associated with intrusions and paranoia than hallucination-proneness, whereas hallucination-proneness is related to perturbed reality discrimination and dissociation.CONCLUSIONS: These results clarify previous research on metacognitive dysfunction in hallucination-proneness, and highlight the importance of controlling for the covariation among symptoms when investigating the cognitive processes underlying psychotic experiences.",
keywords = "Adolescent, Adult, Cognition, Comorbidity, Dissociative Disorders, Female, Hallucinations, Humans, Male, Paranoid Disorders, Predictive Value of Tests, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Psychometrics, Young Adult",
author = "Filippo Varese and Emma Barkus and Bentall, {Richard P.}",
year = "2011",
month = may,
doi = "10.1080/13546805.2010.495244",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "193--217",
journal = "Cognitive Neuropsychiatry",
issn = "1354-6805",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dissociative and metacognitive factors in hallucination-proneness when controlling for comorbid symptoms

AU - Varese, Filippo

AU - Barkus, Emma

AU - Bentall, Richard P.

PY - 2011/5

Y1 - 2011/5

N2 - INTRODUCTION: Recent studies have linked hallucination-proneness to dysfunctional metacognitive beliefs, dissociation, and disrupted capacity to discriminate between internal and external cognitive events (reality discrimination). This study addressed a number of methodological limitations of previous research by investigating the relationship between hallucination-proneness and the aforementioned variables while controlling for comorbid symptoms.METHOD: A large sample of nonclinical participants was screened on measures of hallucination-proneness, cognitive intrusions, paranoid ideation, metacognitive beliefs, and dispositional mindfulness (including measures of dissociation-like experiences). In addition, a signal detection task was used to investigate reality discrimination in four subgroups of participants selected on the basis of their scores on hallucination-proneness and intrusions.RESULTS: Regression analyses for the self-report data were conducted to investigate the predictors of hallucination-proneness and paranoia when controlling for comorbid symptoms. Also, between-group differences on the behavioural data were tested to determine whether perturbed reality discrimination is specifically associated with hallucination-proneness rather than cognitive intrusions. Results revealed that metacognitive beliefs are more strongly associated with intrusions and paranoia than hallucination-proneness, whereas hallucination-proneness is related to perturbed reality discrimination and dissociation.CONCLUSIONS: These results clarify previous research on metacognitive dysfunction in hallucination-proneness, and highlight the importance of controlling for the covariation among symptoms when investigating the cognitive processes underlying psychotic experiences.

AB - INTRODUCTION: Recent studies have linked hallucination-proneness to dysfunctional metacognitive beliefs, dissociation, and disrupted capacity to discriminate between internal and external cognitive events (reality discrimination). This study addressed a number of methodological limitations of previous research by investigating the relationship between hallucination-proneness and the aforementioned variables while controlling for comorbid symptoms.METHOD: A large sample of nonclinical participants was screened on measures of hallucination-proneness, cognitive intrusions, paranoid ideation, metacognitive beliefs, and dispositional mindfulness (including measures of dissociation-like experiences). In addition, a signal detection task was used to investigate reality discrimination in four subgroups of participants selected on the basis of their scores on hallucination-proneness and intrusions.RESULTS: Regression analyses for the self-report data were conducted to investigate the predictors of hallucination-proneness and paranoia when controlling for comorbid symptoms. Also, between-group differences on the behavioural data were tested to determine whether perturbed reality discrimination is specifically associated with hallucination-proneness rather than cognitive intrusions. Results revealed that metacognitive beliefs are more strongly associated with intrusions and paranoia than hallucination-proneness, whereas hallucination-proneness is related to perturbed reality discrimination and dissociation.CONCLUSIONS: These results clarify previous research on metacognitive dysfunction in hallucination-proneness, and highlight the importance of controlling for the covariation among symptoms when investigating the cognitive processes underlying psychotic experiences.

KW - Adolescent

KW - Adult

KW - Cognition

KW - Comorbidity

KW - Dissociative Disorders

KW - Female

KW - Hallucinations

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Paranoid Disorders

KW - Predictive Value of Tests

KW - Psychiatric Status Rating Scales

KW - Psychometrics

KW - Young Adult

U2 - 10.1080/13546805.2010.495244

DO - 10.1080/13546805.2010.495244

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 20694861

VL - 16

SP - 193

EP - 217

JO - Cognitive Neuropsychiatry

JF - Cognitive Neuropsychiatry

SN - 1354-6805

IS - 3

ER -