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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Studies in Higher Education on 21/03/2018, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03075079.2018.1450851

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Does merging improve efficiency? A study of English universities

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Does merging improve efficiency? A study of English universities. / Papadimitriou, Maria; Johnes, Jill.

In: Studies in Higher Education, 21.03.2018.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

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Papadimitriou M, Johnes J. Does merging improve efficiency? A study of English universities. Studies in Higher Education. 2018 Mar 21. Epub 2018 Mar 21. doi: 10.1080/03075079.2018.1450851

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@article{acdc9d6fec414a0485d8867b8b5d7d23,
title = "Does merging improve efficiency? A study of English universities",
abstract = "This paper focuses on the effect of merger on university efficiency. In a first stage analysis, efficiency scores of English universities are derived for a 17-year period using the frontier estimation method data envelopment analysis. A second stage analysis explores the effect of merger and other factors on efficiency. We find that mean efficiency for the sector has varied from around 60% to 70%, but that the efficiency levels of the vast majority of individual higher education institutions (HEIs) are not significantly different from each other. Merged HEIs have an efficiencywhich is around five percentage points higher post-merger than nonmerging HEIs holding all else constant; but we find that the efficiency impact of merger does not last long (not more than a year) after the merger. The transitory nature of the efficiency gain is an important finding which should be noted by politicians and managers considering a policy of merger.",
keywords = "Mergers, Higher education, EFFICIENCY",
author = "Maria Papadimitriou and Jill Johnes",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Studies in Higher Education on 21/03/2018, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03075079.2018.1450851 ",
year = "2018",
month = mar,
day = "21",
doi = "10.1080/03075079.2018.1450851",
language = "English",
journal = "Studies in Higher Education",
issn = "0307-5079",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does merging improve efficiency? A study of English universities

AU - Papadimitriou, Maria

AU - Johnes, Jill

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Studies in Higher Education on 21/03/2018, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03075079.2018.1450851

PY - 2018/3/21

Y1 - 2018/3/21

N2 - This paper focuses on the effect of merger on university efficiency. In a first stage analysis, efficiency scores of English universities are derived for a 17-year period using the frontier estimation method data envelopment analysis. A second stage analysis explores the effect of merger and other factors on efficiency. We find that mean efficiency for the sector has varied from around 60% to 70%, but that the efficiency levels of the vast majority of individual higher education institutions (HEIs) are not significantly different from each other. Merged HEIs have an efficiencywhich is around five percentage points higher post-merger than nonmerging HEIs holding all else constant; but we find that the efficiency impact of merger does not last long (not more than a year) after the merger. The transitory nature of the efficiency gain is an important finding which should be noted by politicians and managers considering a policy of merger.

AB - This paper focuses on the effect of merger on university efficiency. In a first stage analysis, efficiency scores of English universities are derived for a 17-year period using the frontier estimation method data envelopment analysis. A second stage analysis explores the effect of merger and other factors on efficiency. We find that mean efficiency for the sector has varied from around 60% to 70%, but that the efficiency levels of the vast majority of individual higher education institutions (HEIs) are not significantly different from each other. Merged HEIs have an efficiencywhich is around five percentage points higher post-merger than nonmerging HEIs holding all else constant; but we find that the efficiency impact of merger does not last long (not more than a year) after the merger. The transitory nature of the efficiency gain is an important finding which should be noted by politicians and managers considering a policy of merger.

KW - Mergers

KW - Higher education

KW - EFFICIENCY

U2 - 10.1080/03075079.2018.1450851

DO - 10.1080/03075079.2018.1450851

M3 - Journal article

JO - Studies in Higher Education

JF - Studies in Higher Education

SN - 0307-5079

ER -