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Exploring adaptive capacity to phosphorus challenges through two United Kingdom river catchments

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Exploring adaptive capacity to phosphorus challenges through two United Kingdom river catchments. / Lyon, C.; Jacobs, B.; Martin-Ortega, J. et al.

In: Environmental Science and Policy, Vol. 136, 31.10.2022, p. 225-236.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Lyon, C, Jacobs, B, Martin-Ortega, J, Rothwell, SA, Davies, L, Stoate, C, Forber, KJ, Doody, DG & Withers, PJA 2022, 'Exploring adaptive capacity to phosphorus challenges through two United Kingdom river catchments', Environmental Science and Policy, vol. 136, pp. 225-236. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2022.06.001

APA

Lyon, C., Jacobs, B., Martin-Ortega, J., Rothwell, S. A., Davies, L., Stoate, C., Forber, K. J., Doody, D. G., & Withers, P. J. A. (2022). Exploring adaptive capacity to phosphorus challenges through two United Kingdom river catchments. Environmental Science and Policy, 136, 225-236. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2022.06.001

Vancouver

Lyon C, Jacobs B, Martin-Ortega J, Rothwell SA, Davies L, Stoate C et al. Exploring adaptive capacity to phosphorus challenges through two United Kingdom river catchments. Environmental Science and Policy. 2022 Oct 31;136:225-236. Epub 2022 Jun 22. doi: 10.1016/j.envsci.2022.06.001

Author

Lyon, C. ; Jacobs, B. ; Martin-Ortega, J. et al. / Exploring adaptive capacity to phosphorus challenges through two United Kingdom river catchments. In: Environmental Science and Policy. 2022 ; Vol. 136. pp. 225-236.

Bibtex

@article{e4d10afae1344dbbaf8203d5e17ce183,
title = "Exploring adaptive capacity to phosphorus challenges through two United Kingdom river catchments",
abstract = "Phosphorus (P) is a critical natural resource for food production, but one that is subject to global supply vulnerabilities. P is also responsible for endemic eutrophication in waterbodies due to poor stewardship in the food chain. Catchments are natural social-ecologically bounded systems for P use in agriculture and water management. Stakeholders, such as farmers, water and sewerage service companies, local authorities, and environmental organisations mediate catchment adaptive capacity to P supply risks and P pollution in waterbodies. Adaptive capacity at this level has been insufficiently explored in addressing the P challenge, yet is essential to it. We address this gap by exploring through a qualitative study of stakeholders in two United Kingdom catchments. Our results suggest that the awareness and relevance of P-supply challenges is low in catchments, but the problem of waterbody vulnerability to excess P is of greater concern. Our findings highlight the roles in adaptive capacity of entrenched practices; knowledge and training activities and organisations; stakeholder cooperation and synergy; funding, infrastructure, and technology; the governance environment; and time needed to draw down P. We find that farmers and water companies are especially important to adaptive capacity as they directly interact with P flows. We therefore suggest that catchment adaptive capacity would be significantly improved through a well-supported, and expanded package of existing efforts such as providing scientific evidence of catchment P dynamics; training; payments; more empowered local governance. This effort would support catchment stakeholders to adopt effective P-stewardship practices within a multi-decade integrated catchment management strategy.",
keywords = "Phosphorus, Adaptive capacity, Catchments, Stakeholders, Agriculture, Water",
author = "C. Lyon and B. Jacobs and J. Martin-Ortega and S.A. Rothwell and L. Davies and C. Stoate and K.J. Forber and D.G. Doody and P.J.A. Withers",
year = "2022",
month = oct,
day = "31",
doi = "10.1016/j.envsci.2022.06.001",
language = "English",
volume = "136",
pages = "225--236",
journal = "Environmental Science and Policy",
issn = "1462-9011",
publisher = "ELSEVIER SCI LTD",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exploring adaptive capacity to phosphorus challenges through two United Kingdom river catchments

AU - Lyon, C.

AU - Jacobs, B.

AU - Martin-Ortega, J.

AU - Rothwell, S.A.

AU - Davies, L.

AU - Stoate, C.

AU - Forber, K.J.

AU - Doody, D.G.

AU - Withers, P.J.A.

PY - 2022/10/31

Y1 - 2022/10/31

N2 - Phosphorus (P) is a critical natural resource for food production, but one that is subject to global supply vulnerabilities. P is also responsible for endemic eutrophication in waterbodies due to poor stewardship in the food chain. Catchments are natural social-ecologically bounded systems for P use in agriculture and water management. Stakeholders, such as farmers, water and sewerage service companies, local authorities, and environmental organisations mediate catchment adaptive capacity to P supply risks and P pollution in waterbodies. Adaptive capacity at this level has been insufficiently explored in addressing the P challenge, yet is essential to it. We address this gap by exploring through a qualitative study of stakeholders in two United Kingdom catchments. Our results suggest that the awareness and relevance of P-supply challenges is low in catchments, but the problem of waterbody vulnerability to excess P is of greater concern. Our findings highlight the roles in adaptive capacity of entrenched practices; knowledge and training activities and organisations; stakeholder cooperation and synergy; funding, infrastructure, and technology; the governance environment; and time needed to draw down P. We find that farmers and water companies are especially important to adaptive capacity as they directly interact with P flows. We therefore suggest that catchment adaptive capacity would be significantly improved through a well-supported, and expanded package of existing efforts such as providing scientific evidence of catchment P dynamics; training; payments; more empowered local governance. This effort would support catchment stakeholders to adopt effective P-stewardship practices within a multi-decade integrated catchment management strategy.

AB - Phosphorus (P) is a critical natural resource for food production, but one that is subject to global supply vulnerabilities. P is also responsible for endemic eutrophication in waterbodies due to poor stewardship in the food chain. Catchments are natural social-ecologically bounded systems for P use in agriculture and water management. Stakeholders, such as farmers, water and sewerage service companies, local authorities, and environmental organisations mediate catchment adaptive capacity to P supply risks and P pollution in waterbodies. Adaptive capacity at this level has been insufficiently explored in addressing the P challenge, yet is essential to it. We address this gap by exploring through a qualitative study of stakeholders in two United Kingdom catchments. Our results suggest that the awareness and relevance of P-supply challenges is low in catchments, but the problem of waterbody vulnerability to excess P is of greater concern. Our findings highlight the roles in adaptive capacity of entrenched practices; knowledge and training activities and organisations; stakeholder cooperation and synergy; funding, infrastructure, and technology; the governance environment; and time needed to draw down P. We find that farmers and water companies are especially important to adaptive capacity as they directly interact with P flows. We therefore suggest that catchment adaptive capacity would be significantly improved through a well-supported, and expanded package of existing efforts such as providing scientific evidence of catchment P dynamics; training; payments; more empowered local governance. This effort would support catchment stakeholders to adopt effective P-stewardship practices within a multi-decade integrated catchment management strategy.

KW - Phosphorus

KW - Adaptive capacity

KW - Catchments

KW - Stakeholders

KW - Agriculture

KW - Water

U2 - 10.1016/j.envsci.2022.06.001

DO - 10.1016/j.envsci.2022.06.001

M3 - Journal article

VL - 136

SP - 225

EP - 236

JO - Environmental Science and Policy

JF - Environmental Science and Policy

SN - 1462-9011

ER -