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  • PMDD_Work_JPOG_Nov2016.ManuscriptR4_accepted15thJan2017

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology on 21/02/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/0167482X.2017.1286473

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Exploring premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in the work context: a qualitative study

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

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Exploring premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in the work context : a qualitative study. / Hardy, Claire; Hardie, Jenna.

In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 38, No. 4, 02.10.2017, p. 292-300.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Hardy, C & Hardie, J 2017, 'Exploring premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in the work context: a qualitative study', Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 38, no. 4, pp. 292-300. https://doi.org/10.1080/0167482X.2017.1286473

APA

Vancouver

Author

Hardy, Claire ; Hardie, Jenna. / Exploring premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in the work context : a qualitative study. In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2017 ; Vol. 38, No. 4. pp. 292-300.

Bibtex

@article{34c526bad89e4b398203384b0d0dbca2,
title = "Exploring premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in the work context: a qualitative study",
abstract = "This study aims to explore women{\textquoteright}s experience of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in the workplace, and identify if organizations can do anything to help. Analysis of 15 semi-structured interviews, using an inductive thematic analysis approach, revealed the most common symptoms women experience at work include difficulty in concentrating, self-doubt, paranoia, fatigue, tearfulness, a heightened sensitivity to the environment and people, outbursts, and finding social interaction particularly difficult during this premenstrual “episode” phase. It is these symptoms that contribute to observed presenteeism and absenteeism in the work context. After symptoms disappear (with onset of menstruation), women reported feelings of guilt and engage in over-compensatory behaviors such as working longer hours and taking work home during the remainder of the menstrual cycle (i.e. post-episode phase). Women alternate between these phases every month, which over time, accumulate and have additional consequences.",
keywords = "Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), qualitative interviews, work",
author = "Claire Hardy and Jenna Hardie",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology on 21/02/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/0167482X.2017.1286473",
year = "2017",
month = oct,
day = "2",
doi = "10.1080/0167482X.2017.1286473",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "292--300",
journal = "Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology",
issn = "1743-8942",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exploring premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in the work context

T2 - a qualitative study

AU - Hardy, Claire

AU - Hardie, Jenna

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology on 21/02/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/0167482X.2017.1286473

PY - 2017/10/2

Y1 - 2017/10/2

N2 - This study aims to explore women’s experience of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in the workplace, and identify if organizations can do anything to help. Analysis of 15 semi-structured interviews, using an inductive thematic analysis approach, revealed the most common symptoms women experience at work include difficulty in concentrating, self-doubt, paranoia, fatigue, tearfulness, a heightened sensitivity to the environment and people, outbursts, and finding social interaction particularly difficult during this premenstrual “episode” phase. It is these symptoms that contribute to observed presenteeism and absenteeism in the work context. After symptoms disappear (with onset of menstruation), women reported feelings of guilt and engage in over-compensatory behaviors such as working longer hours and taking work home during the remainder of the menstrual cycle (i.e. post-episode phase). Women alternate between these phases every month, which over time, accumulate and have additional consequences.

AB - This study aims to explore women’s experience of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in the workplace, and identify if organizations can do anything to help. Analysis of 15 semi-structured interviews, using an inductive thematic analysis approach, revealed the most common symptoms women experience at work include difficulty in concentrating, self-doubt, paranoia, fatigue, tearfulness, a heightened sensitivity to the environment and people, outbursts, and finding social interaction particularly difficult during this premenstrual “episode” phase. It is these symptoms that contribute to observed presenteeism and absenteeism in the work context. After symptoms disappear (with onset of menstruation), women reported feelings of guilt and engage in over-compensatory behaviors such as working longer hours and taking work home during the remainder of the menstrual cycle (i.e. post-episode phase). Women alternate between these phases every month, which over time, accumulate and have additional consequences.

KW - Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD)

KW - qualitative interviews

KW - work

U2 - 10.1080/0167482X.2017.1286473

DO - 10.1080/0167482X.2017.1286473

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 28635534

VL - 38

SP - 292

EP - 300

JO - Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology

JF - Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology

SN - 1743-8942

IS - 4

ER -