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Exploring the relations between word frequency, language exposure, and bilingualism in a computational model of reading

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Exploring the relations between word frequency, language exposure, and bilingualism in a computational model of reading. / Monaghan, Padraic John; Chang, Ya-Ning; Welbourne, Stephen; Brysbaert, Marc.

In: Journal of Memory and Language, Vol. 93, 04.2017, p. 1-21.

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Monaghan, Padraic John ; Chang, Ya-Ning ; Welbourne, Stephen ; Brysbaert, Marc. / Exploring the relations between word frequency, language exposure, and bilingualism in a computational model of reading. In: Journal of Memory and Language. 2017 ; Vol. 93. pp. 1-21.

Bibtex

@article{a01d1f9dca1f4f9199980abb2210f83a,
title = "Exploring the relations between word frequency, language exposure, and bilingualism in a computational model of reading",
abstract = "Individuals show differences in the extent to which psycholinguistic variables predict their responses for lexical processing tasks. A key variable accounting for much variance in lexical processing is frequency, but the size of the frequency effect has been demonstrated to reduce as a consequence of the individual{\textquoteright}s vocabulary size. Using a connectionist computational implementation of the triangle model on a large set of English words, where orthographic, phonological, and semantic representations interact during processing, we show that the model demonstrates a reduced frequency effect as a consequence of amount of exposure to the language, a variable that was also a cause of greater vocabulary size in the model. The model was also trained to learn a second language, Dutch, and replicated behavioural observations that increased proficiency in a second language resulted in reduced frequency effects for that language but increased frequency effects in the first language. The model provides a first step to demonstrating causal relations between psycholinguistic variables in a model of individual differences in lexical processing, and the effect of bilingualism on interacting variables within the language processing system.",
keywords = "Reading, Frequency effects, Computational modelling, Individual differences, Bilingualism, Lifespan development",
author = "Monaghan, {Padraic John} and Ya-Ning Chang and Stephen Welbourne and Marc Brysbaert",
year = "2017",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1016/j.jml.2016.08.003",
language = "English",
volume = "93",
pages = "1--21",
journal = "Journal of Memory and Language",
issn = "0749-596X",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exploring the relations between word frequency, language exposure, and bilingualism in a computational model of reading

AU - Monaghan, Padraic John

AU - Chang, Ya-Ning

AU - Welbourne, Stephen

AU - Brysbaert, Marc

PY - 2017/4

Y1 - 2017/4

N2 - Individuals show differences in the extent to which psycholinguistic variables predict their responses for lexical processing tasks. A key variable accounting for much variance in lexical processing is frequency, but the size of the frequency effect has been demonstrated to reduce as a consequence of the individual’s vocabulary size. Using a connectionist computational implementation of the triangle model on a large set of English words, where orthographic, phonological, and semantic representations interact during processing, we show that the model demonstrates a reduced frequency effect as a consequence of amount of exposure to the language, a variable that was also a cause of greater vocabulary size in the model. The model was also trained to learn a second language, Dutch, and replicated behavioural observations that increased proficiency in a second language resulted in reduced frequency effects for that language but increased frequency effects in the first language. The model provides a first step to demonstrating causal relations between psycholinguistic variables in a model of individual differences in lexical processing, and the effect of bilingualism on interacting variables within the language processing system.

AB - Individuals show differences in the extent to which psycholinguistic variables predict their responses for lexical processing tasks. A key variable accounting for much variance in lexical processing is frequency, but the size of the frequency effect has been demonstrated to reduce as a consequence of the individual’s vocabulary size. Using a connectionist computational implementation of the triangle model on a large set of English words, where orthographic, phonological, and semantic representations interact during processing, we show that the model demonstrates a reduced frequency effect as a consequence of amount of exposure to the language, a variable that was also a cause of greater vocabulary size in the model. The model was also trained to learn a second language, Dutch, and replicated behavioural observations that increased proficiency in a second language resulted in reduced frequency effects for that language but increased frequency effects in the first language. The model provides a first step to demonstrating causal relations between psycholinguistic variables in a model of individual differences in lexical processing, and the effect of bilingualism on interacting variables within the language processing system.

KW - Reading

KW - Frequency effects

KW - Computational modelling

KW - Individual differences

KW - Bilingualism

KW - Lifespan development

U2 - 10.1016/j.jml.2016.08.003

DO - 10.1016/j.jml.2016.08.003

M3 - Journal article

VL - 93

SP - 1

EP - 21

JO - Journal of Memory and Language

JF - Journal of Memory and Language

SN - 0749-596X

ER -