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First joint observation by the underground gravitational-wave detector, KAGRA, with GEO 600

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First joint observation by the underground gravitational-wave detector, KAGRA, with GEO 600. / LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Collaboration & KAGRA Collaboration ; Hewitt, Amy; Pitkin, Matthew.

In: Progress of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Vol. 2022, No. 6, 063F01, 30.06.2022.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Collaboration & KAGRA Collaboration, Hewitt, A & Pitkin, M 2022, 'First joint observation by the underground gravitational-wave detector, KAGRA, with GEO 600', Progress of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, vol. 2022, no. 6, 063F01. https://doi.org/10.1093/ptep/ptac073

APA

LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Collaboration & KAGRA Collaboration, Hewitt, A., & Pitkin, M. (2022). First joint observation by the underground gravitational-wave detector, KAGRA, with GEO 600. Progress of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, 2022(6), [063F01]. https://doi.org/10.1093/ptep/ptac073

Vancouver

LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Collaboration & KAGRA Collaboration, Hewitt A, Pitkin M. First joint observation by the underground gravitational-wave detector, KAGRA, with GEO 600. Progress of Theoretical and Experimental Physics. 2022 Jun 30;2022(6):063F01. Epub 2022 Apr 30. doi: 10.1093/ptep/ptac073

Author

LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Collaboration & KAGRA Collaboration ; Hewitt, Amy ; Pitkin, Matthew. / First joint observation by the underground gravitational-wave detector, KAGRA, with GEO 600. In: Progress of Theoretical and Experimental Physics. 2022 ; Vol. 2022, No. 6.

Bibtex

@article{f0af842baab7443888b1b6331d462266,
title = "First joint observation by the underground gravitational-wave detector, KAGRA, with GEO 600",
abstract = "We report the results of the first joint observation of the KAGRA detector with GEO600. KAGRA is a cryogenic and underground gravitational-wave detector consisting of a laser interferometer with three-kilometer arms, and located in Kamioka, Gifu, Japan. GEO600 is a British–German laser interferometer with 600m arms, and located near Hannover, Germany. GEO600 and KAGRA performed a joint observing run from April 7 to 20, 2020. We present the results of the joint analysis of the GEO–KAGRA data for transient gravitational-wave signals, including the coalescence of neutron-star binaries and generic unmodeled transients. We also perform dedicated searches for binary coalescence signals and generic transients associated with gamma-ray burst events observed during the joint run. No gravitational-wave events were identified. We evaluate the minimum detectable amplitude for various types of transient signals and the spacetime volume for which the network is sensitive to binary neutron-star coalescences. We also place lower limits on the distances to the gamma-ray bursts analysed based on the non-detection of an associated gravitational-wave signal for several signal models, including binary coalescences. These analyses demonstrate the feasibility and utility of KAGRA as a member of the global gravitational-wave detector network.",
keywords = "General Physics and Astronomy",
author = "{LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Collaboration & KAGRA Collaboration} and Amy Hewitt and Matthew Pitkin",
year = "2022",
month = jun,
day = "30",
doi = "10.1093/ptep/ptac073",
language = "English",
volume = "2022",
journal = "Progress of Theoretical and Experimental Physics",
issn = "2050-3911",
publisher = "Physical Society of Japan",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - First joint observation by the underground gravitational-wave detector, KAGRA, with GEO 600

AU - LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Collaboration & KAGRA Collaboration

AU - Hewitt, Amy

AU - Pitkin, Matthew

PY - 2022/6/30

Y1 - 2022/6/30

N2 - We report the results of the first joint observation of the KAGRA detector with GEO600. KAGRA is a cryogenic and underground gravitational-wave detector consisting of a laser interferometer with three-kilometer arms, and located in Kamioka, Gifu, Japan. GEO600 is a British–German laser interferometer with 600m arms, and located near Hannover, Germany. GEO600 and KAGRA performed a joint observing run from April 7 to 20, 2020. We present the results of the joint analysis of the GEO–KAGRA data for transient gravitational-wave signals, including the coalescence of neutron-star binaries and generic unmodeled transients. We also perform dedicated searches for binary coalescence signals and generic transients associated with gamma-ray burst events observed during the joint run. No gravitational-wave events were identified. We evaluate the minimum detectable amplitude for various types of transient signals and the spacetime volume for which the network is sensitive to binary neutron-star coalescences. We also place lower limits on the distances to the gamma-ray bursts analysed based on the non-detection of an associated gravitational-wave signal for several signal models, including binary coalescences. These analyses demonstrate the feasibility and utility of KAGRA as a member of the global gravitational-wave detector network.

AB - We report the results of the first joint observation of the KAGRA detector with GEO600. KAGRA is a cryogenic and underground gravitational-wave detector consisting of a laser interferometer with three-kilometer arms, and located in Kamioka, Gifu, Japan. GEO600 is a British–German laser interferometer with 600m arms, and located near Hannover, Germany. GEO600 and KAGRA performed a joint observing run from April 7 to 20, 2020. We present the results of the joint analysis of the GEO–KAGRA data for transient gravitational-wave signals, including the coalescence of neutron-star binaries and generic unmodeled transients. We also perform dedicated searches for binary coalescence signals and generic transients associated with gamma-ray burst events observed during the joint run. No gravitational-wave events were identified. We evaluate the minimum detectable amplitude for various types of transient signals and the spacetime volume for which the network is sensitive to binary neutron-star coalescences. We also place lower limits on the distances to the gamma-ray bursts analysed based on the non-detection of an associated gravitational-wave signal for several signal models, including binary coalescences. These analyses demonstrate the feasibility and utility of KAGRA as a member of the global gravitational-wave detector network.

KW - General Physics and Astronomy

U2 - 10.1093/ptep/ptac073

DO - 10.1093/ptep/ptac073

M3 - Journal article

VL - 2022

JO - Progress of Theoretical and Experimental Physics

JF - Progress of Theoretical and Experimental Physics

SN - 2050-3911

IS - 6

M1 - 063F01

ER -