Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Frailty and resilience

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Frailty and resilience: Are they necessarily mutually exclusive?

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings - With ISBN/ISSNChapter

Published

Standard

Frailty and resilience : Are they necessarily mutually exclusive? / Holland, Carol; Garner, Ian; Gwyther, Holly.

Psychologies of Ageing: Theory, Research and Practice. ed. / Elizabeth Peel; Carol Holland; Michael Murray. Cham : Palgrave Macmillan, 2018. p. 157-185.

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings - With ISBN/ISSNChapter

Harvard

Holland, C, Garner, I & Gwyther, H 2018, Frailty and resilience: Are they necessarily mutually exclusive? in E Peel, C Holland & M Murray (eds), Psychologies of Ageing: Theory, Research and Practice. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham, pp. 157-185. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-97034-9_7

APA

Holland, C., Garner, I., & Gwyther, H. (2018). Frailty and resilience: Are they necessarily mutually exclusive? In E. Peel, C. Holland, & M. Murray (Eds.), Psychologies of Ageing: Theory, Research and Practice (pp. 157-185). Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-97034-9_7

Vancouver

Holland C, Garner I, Gwyther H. Frailty and resilience: Are they necessarily mutually exclusive? In Peel E, Holland C, Murray M, editors, Psychologies of Ageing: Theory, Research and Practice. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan. 2018. p. 157-185 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-97034-9_7

Author

Holland, Carol ; Garner, Ian ; Gwyther, Holly. / Frailty and resilience : Are they necessarily mutually exclusive?. Psychologies of Ageing: Theory, Research and Practice. editor / Elizabeth Peel ; Carol Holland ; Michael Murray. Cham : Palgrave Macmillan, 2018. pp. 157-185

Bibtex

@inbook{35058b3394134ddd8ea2e0ab1d2ebb2d,
title = "Frailty and resilience: Are they necessarily mutually exclusive?",
abstract = "Frailty is often seen as the absence of resilience. There is evidence to support prevention and intervention strategies for frailty across the range of robust to frail older adults. The role of health psychology in the design and implementation of interventions and the development of understanding that frailty can be addressed even amongst the very old is central to progress in improving quality of life for people at all stages of frailty and also to improving resilience. This chapter reviews the concept of frailty, currently based largely on a physically described syndrome, and examines the role of psychological and social variables in the interaction between frailty and outcomes for the individual. The phenomenon of resilience despite frailty is examined in the context of outcomes of research that suggest that support for developing resilience is needed alongside interventions for frailty.",
keywords = "Ageing, Frailty, Resilience, Intervention, Health psychology, Qualitative methods, Realist review",
author = "Carol Holland and Ian Garner and Holly Gwyther",
year = "2018",
month = oct,
day = "9",
doi = "10.1007/978-3-319-97034-9_7",
language = "English",
isbn = "9783319970332",
pages = "157--185",
editor = "Elizabeth Peel and Carol Holland and Murray, {Michael }",
booktitle = "Psychologies of Ageing",
publisher = "Palgrave Macmillan",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Frailty and resilience

T2 - Are they necessarily mutually exclusive?

AU - Holland, Carol

AU - Garner, Ian

AU - Gwyther, Holly

PY - 2018/10/9

Y1 - 2018/10/9

N2 - Frailty is often seen as the absence of resilience. There is evidence to support prevention and intervention strategies for frailty across the range of robust to frail older adults. The role of health psychology in the design and implementation of interventions and the development of understanding that frailty can be addressed even amongst the very old is central to progress in improving quality of life for people at all stages of frailty and also to improving resilience. This chapter reviews the concept of frailty, currently based largely on a physically described syndrome, and examines the role of psychological and social variables in the interaction between frailty and outcomes for the individual. The phenomenon of resilience despite frailty is examined in the context of outcomes of research that suggest that support for developing resilience is needed alongside interventions for frailty.

AB - Frailty is often seen as the absence of resilience. There is evidence to support prevention and intervention strategies for frailty across the range of robust to frail older adults. The role of health psychology in the design and implementation of interventions and the development of understanding that frailty can be addressed even amongst the very old is central to progress in improving quality of life for people at all stages of frailty and also to improving resilience. This chapter reviews the concept of frailty, currently based largely on a physically described syndrome, and examines the role of psychological and social variables in the interaction between frailty and outcomes for the individual. The phenomenon of resilience despite frailty is examined in the context of outcomes of research that suggest that support for developing resilience is needed alongside interventions for frailty.

KW - Ageing

KW - Frailty

KW - Resilience

KW - Intervention

KW - Health psychology

KW - Qualitative methods

KW - Realist review

U2 - 10.1007/978-3-319-97034-9_7

DO - 10.1007/978-3-319-97034-9_7

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9783319970332

SP - 157

EP - 185

BT - Psychologies of Ageing

A2 - Peel, Elizabeth

A2 - Holland, Carol

A2 - Murray, Michael

PB - Palgrave Macmillan

CY - Cham

ER -