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Future Internet Congestion Control: The Diminishing Feedback Problem

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Published

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Future Internet Congestion Control : The Diminishing Feedback Problem. / Welzl, Michael; Teymoori, Peyman; Islam, Safiqul et al.

In: IEEE Communications Magazine, Vol. 60, No. 9, 9, 01.09.2022, p. 87-92.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Welzl, M, Teymoori, P, Islam, S, Hutchison, D & Gjessing, S 2022, 'Future Internet Congestion Control: The Diminishing Feedback Problem', IEEE Communications Magazine, vol. 60, no. 9, 9, pp. 87-92. https://doi.org/10.1109/MCOM.006.2200008

APA

Welzl, M., Teymoori, P., Islam, S., Hutchison, D., & Gjessing, S. (2022). Future Internet Congestion Control: The Diminishing Feedback Problem. IEEE Communications Magazine, 60(9), 87-92. [9]. https://doi.org/10.1109/MCOM.006.2200008

Vancouver

Welzl M, Teymoori P, Islam S, Hutchison D, Gjessing S. Future Internet Congestion Control: The Diminishing Feedback Problem. IEEE Communications Magazine. 2022 Sep 1;60(9):87-92. 9. Epub 2022 Jul 6. doi: 10.1109/MCOM.006.2200008

Author

Welzl, Michael ; Teymoori, Peyman ; Islam, Safiqul et al. / Future Internet Congestion Control : The Diminishing Feedback Problem. In: IEEE Communications Magazine. 2022 ; Vol. 60, No. 9. pp. 87-92.

Bibtex

@article{93115eb877ca485bab8a08815aa7f100,
title = "Future Internet Congestion Control: The Diminishing Feedback Problem",
abstract = "It is increasingly difficult for Internet congestion control mechanisms to obtain the feedback that they need. This lack of feedback can have severe performance implications, and it is bound to become worse. In the long run, the problem may only be fixable by fundamentally changing the way congestion control is done in the Internet. We substantiate this claim by looking at the evolution of the Internet's infrastructure over the past 30 years, and by examining the most common behavior of Internet traffic. Considering the goals that congestion control mechanisms are intended to address, and taking into account contextual developments in the Internet ecosystem, we arrive at conclusions and recommendations about possible future congestion control design directions. In particular, we argue that congestion control mechanisms should move away from their strict 'end-to-end' adherence. This change would benefit from avoiding a 'one size fits all circumstances' approach, and moving toward a more selective set of mechanisms that will result in a better performing Internet. We also discuss how this future vision differs from today's use of performance enhancing proxies.",
author = "Michael Welzl and Peyman Teymoori and Safiqul Islam and David Hutchison and Stein Gjessing",
note = "{\textcopyright}2022 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.",
year = "2022",
month = sep,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1109/MCOM.006.2200008",
language = "English",
volume = "60",
pages = "87--92",
journal = "IEEE Communications Magazine",
issn = "0163-6804",
publisher = "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.",
number = "9",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Future Internet Congestion Control

T2 - The Diminishing Feedback Problem

AU - Welzl, Michael

AU - Teymoori, Peyman

AU - Islam, Safiqul

AU - Hutchison, David

AU - Gjessing, Stein

N1 - ©2022 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.

PY - 2022/9/1

Y1 - 2022/9/1

N2 - It is increasingly difficult for Internet congestion control mechanisms to obtain the feedback that they need. This lack of feedback can have severe performance implications, and it is bound to become worse. In the long run, the problem may only be fixable by fundamentally changing the way congestion control is done in the Internet. We substantiate this claim by looking at the evolution of the Internet's infrastructure over the past 30 years, and by examining the most common behavior of Internet traffic. Considering the goals that congestion control mechanisms are intended to address, and taking into account contextual developments in the Internet ecosystem, we arrive at conclusions and recommendations about possible future congestion control design directions. In particular, we argue that congestion control mechanisms should move away from their strict 'end-to-end' adherence. This change would benefit from avoiding a 'one size fits all circumstances' approach, and moving toward a more selective set of mechanisms that will result in a better performing Internet. We also discuss how this future vision differs from today's use of performance enhancing proxies.

AB - It is increasingly difficult for Internet congestion control mechanisms to obtain the feedback that they need. This lack of feedback can have severe performance implications, and it is bound to become worse. In the long run, the problem may only be fixable by fundamentally changing the way congestion control is done in the Internet. We substantiate this claim by looking at the evolution of the Internet's infrastructure over the past 30 years, and by examining the most common behavior of Internet traffic. Considering the goals that congestion control mechanisms are intended to address, and taking into account contextual developments in the Internet ecosystem, we arrive at conclusions and recommendations about possible future congestion control design directions. In particular, we argue that congestion control mechanisms should move away from their strict 'end-to-end' adherence. This change would benefit from avoiding a 'one size fits all circumstances' approach, and moving toward a more selective set of mechanisms that will result in a better performing Internet. We also discuss how this future vision differs from today's use of performance enhancing proxies.

U2 - 10.1109/MCOM.006.2200008

DO - 10.1109/MCOM.006.2200008

M3 - Journal article

VL - 60

SP - 87

EP - 92

JO - IEEE Communications Magazine

JF - IEEE Communications Magazine

SN - 0163-6804

IS - 9

M1 - 9

ER -