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  • HeadBanger: Controlling Switchable Software with Head Gesture

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HeadBanger: controlling switchable software with head gesture

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>10/03/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Assistive Technologies
Issue number1
Volume10
Number of pages9
Pages (from-to)2-10
Publication StatusPublished
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract


Purpose
– The purpose of this paper is to present a novel non-contact method of using head movement to control software without the need for wearable devices.

Design/methodology/approach
– A webcam and software are used to track head position. When the head is moved through a virtual target, a keystroke is simulated. The system was assessed by participants with impaired mobility using Sensory Software’s Grid 2 software as a test platform.

Findings
– The target user group could effectively use this system to interact with switchable software.

Practical implications
– Physical head switches could be replaced with virtual devices, reducing fatigue and dissatisfaction.

Originality/value
– Using a webcam to control software using head gestures where the participant does not have to wear any specialised technology or a marker. This system is shown to be of benefit to motor impaired participants for operating switchable software.

Bibliographic note

This article is (c) Emerald Group Publishing and permission has been granted for this version to appear here. Emerald does not grant permission for this article to be further copied/distributed or hosted elsewhere without the express permission from Emerald Group Publishing Limited.