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  • HeadBanger: Controlling Switchable Software with Head Gesture

    Rights statement: This article is (c) Emerald Group Publishing and permission has been granted for this version to appear here. Emerald does not grant permission for this article to be further copied/distributed or hosted elsewhere without the express permission from Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

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HeadBanger: controlling switchable software with head gesture

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HeadBanger : controlling switchable software with head gesture. / Oppenheim, Matthew Jeremy.

In: Journal of Assistive Technologies, Vol. 10, No. 1, 10.03.2016, p. 2-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

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Oppenheim, Matthew Jeremy. / HeadBanger : controlling switchable software with head gesture. In: Journal of Assistive Technologies. 2016 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 2-10.

Bibtex

@article{b87494dbc79142fd9306199dd790f553,
title = "HeadBanger: controlling switchable software with head gesture",
abstract = "Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to present a novel non-contact method of using head movement to control software without the need for wearable devices.Design/methodology/approach– A webcam and software are used to track head position. When the head is moved through a virtual target, a keystroke is simulated. The system was assessed by participants with impaired mobility using Sensory Software{\textquoteright}s Grid 2 software as a test platform.Findings– The target user group could effectively use this system to interact with switchable software.Practical implications– Physical head switches could be replaced with virtual devices, reducing fatigue and dissatisfaction.Originality/value– Using a webcam to control software using head gestures where the participant does not have to wear any specialised technology or a marker. This system is shown to be of benefit to motor impaired participants for operating switchable software.",
keywords = "Assistive technology, Software, Head gesture, Depth camera, Virtual control, Webcam",
author = "Oppenheim, {Matthew Jeremy}",
note = "This article is (c) Emerald Group Publishing and permission has been granted for this version to appear here. Emerald does not grant permission for this article to be further copied/distributed or hosted elsewhere without the express permission from Emerald Group Publishing Limited.",
year = "2016",
month = mar,
day = "10",
doi = "10.1108/JAT-04-2015-0015",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "2--10",
journal = "Journal of Assistive Technologies",
issn = "1754-9450",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - HeadBanger

T2 - controlling switchable software with head gesture

AU - Oppenheim, Matthew Jeremy

N1 - This article is (c) Emerald Group Publishing and permission has been granted for this version to appear here. Emerald does not grant permission for this article to be further copied/distributed or hosted elsewhere without the express permission from Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

PY - 2016/3/10

Y1 - 2016/3/10

N2 - Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to present a novel non-contact method of using head movement to control software without the need for wearable devices.Design/methodology/approach– A webcam and software are used to track head position. When the head is moved through a virtual target, a keystroke is simulated. The system was assessed by participants with impaired mobility using Sensory Software’s Grid 2 software as a test platform.Findings– The target user group could effectively use this system to interact with switchable software.Practical implications– Physical head switches could be replaced with virtual devices, reducing fatigue and dissatisfaction.Originality/value– Using a webcam to control software using head gestures where the participant does not have to wear any specialised technology or a marker. This system is shown to be of benefit to motor impaired participants for operating switchable software.

AB - Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to present a novel non-contact method of using head movement to control software without the need for wearable devices.Design/methodology/approach– A webcam and software are used to track head position. When the head is moved through a virtual target, a keystroke is simulated. The system was assessed by participants with impaired mobility using Sensory Software’s Grid 2 software as a test platform.Findings– The target user group could effectively use this system to interact with switchable software.Practical implications– Physical head switches could be replaced with virtual devices, reducing fatigue and dissatisfaction.Originality/value– Using a webcam to control software using head gestures where the participant does not have to wear any specialised technology or a marker. This system is shown to be of benefit to motor impaired participants for operating switchable software.

KW - Assistive technology

KW - Software

KW - Head gesture

KW - Depth camera

KW - Virtual control

KW - Webcam

U2 - 10.1108/JAT-04-2015-0015

DO - 10.1108/JAT-04-2015-0015

M3 - Journal article

VL - 10

SP - 2

EP - 10

JO - Journal of Assistive Technologies

JF - Journal of Assistive Technologies

SN - 1754-9450

IS - 1

ER -