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Historical trends of biogenic SOA tracers in an ice core from Kamchatka Peninsula

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

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  • Pingqing Fu
  • Kimitaka Kawamura
  • Osamu Seki
  • Yusuke Izawa
  • Takayuki Shiraiwa
  • Kirsti Ashworth
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>11/10/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Environmental Science and Technology Letters
Issue number10
Volume3
Number of pages8
Pages (from-to)351-358
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date30/08/16
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is ubiquitous in the Earth’s atmosphere, influencing climate and air quality. However, the historical trend of biogenic SOA is not well known. Here, we report for the first time the major isoprene- and monoterpene-derived SOA tracers preserved in an ice core from the Kamchatka Peninsula. Significant variations are recorded during the past 300 years with lower concentrations in the early-to-middle 19th century and higher concentrations in the preindustrial period and the present day. We discovered that isoprene SOA tracers were more abundant in the preindustrial period than the present day, while monoterpene SOA tracers stay almost unchanged. The causes of the observed variability are complex, depending on atmospheric circulation, changes in emissions, and other factors such as tropospheric oxidative capacity. Our data presents an unprecedented opportunity to shed light on the formation, evolution, and fate of atmospheric aerosols and to constrain the uncertainties associated with modeling their atmospheric concentrations.

Bibliographic note

This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in Environmental Science and Technology Letters, copyright ©2016 American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.estlett.6b00275