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  • ANAE.2022.00318_FINAL_Submitted

    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:Shelton, C.L. and Goodwin, D.S. (2022), How to plan and report a qualitative study. Anaesthesia. https://doi.org/10.1111/anae.15788 which has been published in final form at https://associationofanaesthetists-publications.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/anae.15788 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

    Accepted author manuscript, 217 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 21/06/23

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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How to plan and report a qualitative study

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How to plan and report a qualitative study. / Shelton, Cliff; Goodwin, Dawn.

In: Anaesthesia, 21.06.2022.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

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@article{fc282744459d4099af98c62c6164f725,
title = "How to plan and report a qualitative study",
abstract = "Qualitative research describes a suite of techniques that deal with unstructured data that cannot be summarised numerically. It typically approaches problems from a constructivist approach (i.e. there are multiple {\textquoteleft}truths{\textquoteright} which are socially constructed and dependent on context), whilst quantitative research adopts positivist standpoint (i.e. there is a definitive {\textquoteleft}truth{\textquoteright} that can be observed). The research methods involved in qualitative research, often based on discussion or observation, can generate vast quantities of data, and these can be challenging to summarise in a way that fits with journal guidelines for authors and is accessible for the reader. Furthermore, the processes involved in qualitative research are heavily reliant on the researchers themselves ; researchers must, therefore, strike a balance between a rigorous application of methods and an acknowledgement of their own influence on the work. This open acceptance that the researcher is a fundamental part of the research is known as {\textquoteleft}reflexivity{\textquoteright} .As part of the {\textquoteleft}Reviewer Recommendations{\textquoteright} series, we draw on our experience of qualitative research in patient safety and peri-operative practice to suggest effective ways to conduct and report qualitative work. We begin by briefly outlining the types of questions that are commonly answered in qualitative research and the methods that are used to investigate them. We then focus on describing the key components of a qualitative report, consider the hallmarks of high-quality qualitative research, suggest methods for demonstrating rigour and emphasise the importance of maintaining a reflexive approach throughout.",
author = "Cliff Shelton and Dawn Goodwin",
note = "This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:Shelton, C.L. and Goodwin, D.S. (2022), How to plan and report a qualitative study. Anaesthesia. https://doi.org/10.1111/anae.15788 which has been published in final form at https://associationofanaesthetists-publications.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/anae.15788 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.",
year = "2022",
month = jun,
day = "21",
doi = "10.1111/anae.15788",
language = "English",
journal = "Anaesthesia",
issn = "0003-2409",
publisher = "Blackwell Publishing Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - How to plan and report a qualitative study

AU - Shelton, Cliff

AU - Goodwin, Dawn

N1 - This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:Shelton, C.L. and Goodwin, D.S. (2022), How to plan and report a qualitative study. Anaesthesia. https://doi.org/10.1111/anae.15788 which has been published in final form at https://associationofanaesthetists-publications.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/anae.15788 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

PY - 2022/6/21

Y1 - 2022/6/21

N2 - Qualitative research describes a suite of techniques that deal with unstructured data that cannot be summarised numerically. It typically approaches problems from a constructivist approach (i.e. there are multiple ‘truths’ which are socially constructed and dependent on context), whilst quantitative research adopts positivist standpoint (i.e. there is a definitive ‘truth’ that can be observed). The research methods involved in qualitative research, often based on discussion or observation, can generate vast quantities of data, and these can be challenging to summarise in a way that fits with journal guidelines for authors and is accessible for the reader. Furthermore, the processes involved in qualitative research are heavily reliant on the researchers themselves ; researchers must, therefore, strike a balance between a rigorous application of methods and an acknowledgement of their own influence on the work. This open acceptance that the researcher is a fundamental part of the research is known as ‘reflexivity’ .As part of the ‘Reviewer Recommendations’ series, we draw on our experience of qualitative research in patient safety and peri-operative practice to suggest effective ways to conduct and report qualitative work. We begin by briefly outlining the types of questions that are commonly answered in qualitative research and the methods that are used to investigate them. We then focus on describing the key components of a qualitative report, consider the hallmarks of high-quality qualitative research, suggest methods for demonstrating rigour and emphasise the importance of maintaining a reflexive approach throughout.

AB - Qualitative research describes a suite of techniques that deal with unstructured data that cannot be summarised numerically. It typically approaches problems from a constructivist approach (i.e. there are multiple ‘truths’ which are socially constructed and dependent on context), whilst quantitative research adopts positivist standpoint (i.e. there is a definitive ‘truth’ that can be observed). The research methods involved in qualitative research, often based on discussion or observation, can generate vast quantities of data, and these can be challenging to summarise in a way that fits with journal guidelines for authors and is accessible for the reader. Furthermore, the processes involved in qualitative research are heavily reliant on the researchers themselves ; researchers must, therefore, strike a balance between a rigorous application of methods and an acknowledgement of their own influence on the work. This open acceptance that the researcher is a fundamental part of the research is known as ‘reflexivity’ .As part of the ‘Reviewer Recommendations’ series, we draw on our experience of qualitative research in patient safety and peri-operative practice to suggest effective ways to conduct and report qualitative work. We begin by briefly outlining the types of questions that are commonly answered in qualitative research and the methods that are used to investigate them. We then focus on describing the key components of a qualitative report, consider the hallmarks of high-quality qualitative research, suggest methods for demonstrating rigour and emphasise the importance of maintaining a reflexive approach throughout.

U2 - 10.1111/anae.15788

DO - 10.1111/anae.15788

M3 - Journal article

JO - Anaesthesia

JF - Anaesthesia

SN - 0003-2409

ER -