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Metaphors in Guardian Online and Mail Online opinion-page content on climate change: war, religion, and politics

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Metaphors in Guardian Online and Mail Online opinion-page content on climate change : war, religion, and politics. / Atanasova, Dimitrinka; Koteyko, Nelya.

In: Environmental Communication, Vol. 11, No. 4, 01.06.2017, p. 452-469.

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Atanasova, Dimitrinka ; Koteyko, Nelya. / Metaphors in Guardian Online and Mail Online opinion-page content on climate change : war, religion, and politics. In: Environmental Communication. 2017 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 452-469.

Bibtex

@article{983646390b3b40f2950a69cd863e2e7d,
title = "Metaphors in Guardian Online and Mail Online opinion-page content on climate change: war, religion, and politics",
abstract = "In climate change-related media discourses metaphors are used to (re-)conceptualize climate change science as well as climate change mitigation/adaptation efforts. Using critical metaphor analysis, we study linguistic and conceptual metaphors in opinion-page content from the British online newspapers Guardian Online and Mail Online, while paying attention to the arguments they advance. We find that Guardian Online employed war metaphors to advance pro-climate change arguments. War metaphors were used to (1) communicate the urgency to act on climate change and (2) conceptualize climate change politics. Mail Online employed religion metaphors to furnish skeptic/contrarian arguments. Religion metaphors were used to (1) downplay the urgency to act on climate change and (2) conceptualize transitions from climate change belief to skepticism. These findings raise concerns about sustained policy gridlock and refute expectations about novelty in climate change-related media discourses (as both war and religion have a history of use).",
keywords = "climate change, media, metaphors, politics, UK",
author = "Dimitrinka Atanasova and Nelya Koteyko",
year = "2017",
month = jun,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/17524032.2015.1024705",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "452--469",
journal = "Environmental Communication",
issn = "1752-4032",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metaphors in Guardian Online and Mail Online opinion-page content on climate change

T2 - war, religion, and politics

AU - Atanasova, Dimitrinka

AU - Koteyko, Nelya

PY - 2017/6/1

Y1 - 2017/6/1

N2 - In climate change-related media discourses metaphors are used to (re-)conceptualize climate change science as well as climate change mitigation/adaptation efforts. Using critical metaphor analysis, we study linguistic and conceptual metaphors in opinion-page content from the British online newspapers Guardian Online and Mail Online, while paying attention to the arguments they advance. We find that Guardian Online employed war metaphors to advance pro-climate change arguments. War metaphors were used to (1) communicate the urgency to act on climate change and (2) conceptualize climate change politics. Mail Online employed religion metaphors to furnish skeptic/contrarian arguments. Religion metaphors were used to (1) downplay the urgency to act on climate change and (2) conceptualize transitions from climate change belief to skepticism. These findings raise concerns about sustained policy gridlock and refute expectations about novelty in climate change-related media discourses (as both war and religion have a history of use).

AB - In climate change-related media discourses metaphors are used to (re-)conceptualize climate change science as well as climate change mitigation/adaptation efforts. Using critical metaphor analysis, we study linguistic and conceptual metaphors in opinion-page content from the British online newspapers Guardian Online and Mail Online, while paying attention to the arguments they advance. We find that Guardian Online employed war metaphors to advance pro-climate change arguments. War metaphors were used to (1) communicate the urgency to act on climate change and (2) conceptualize climate change politics. Mail Online employed religion metaphors to furnish skeptic/contrarian arguments. Religion metaphors were used to (1) downplay the urgency to act on climate change and (2) conceptualize transitions from climate change belief to skepticism. These findings raise concerns about sustained policy gridlock and refute expectations about novelty in climate change-related media discourses (as both war and religion have a history of use).

KW - climate change

KW - media

KW - metaphors

KW - politics

KW - UK

U2 - 10.1080/17524032.2015.1024705

DO - 10.1080/17524032.2015.1024705

M3 - Journal article

VL - 11

SP - 452

EP - 469

JO - Environmental Communication

JF - Environmental Communication

SN - 1752-4032

IS - 4

ER -