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  • FJPS-2019-0091.R1_Proof_hi

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in The Journal of Peasant Studies on 10/12/2019, available online:  https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03066150.2019.1680543

    Accepted author manuscript, 943 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Mob Justice and ‘The Civilized Commodity’

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>30/06/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>The Journal of Peasant Studies
Issue number4
Volume48
Number of pages20
Pages (from-to)734-753
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date10/12/19
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Our theory of ‘the civilized commodity' examines ‘mob violence' affecting high-value commodities, including the vanilla boom of Madagascar. We illustrate producers' labor under fraught conditions of violence and contradictory claims of ‘street justice.' Specifically we ask, what counts as justice and to whom? We highlights broader arguments around ‘moral hyper-proximity' of producer-consumer relations, and the strategies of state and market actors to circulate ‘civilized' visions for systemic and future governance over commodity landscapes. State and market calls for ‘law and order,' however, obscure the structural inequities faced by smallholders in their ‘everyday’ production of commodities under periodic crisis.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in The Journal of Peasant Studies on 10/12/2019, available online:  https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03066150.2019.1680543