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Music and natural image processing share a common feature-integration rule

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Music and natural image processing share a common feature-integration rule. / To, Michelle; Troscianko, Tom; Tolhurst, David J.

CogSci 2009. Cognitive Science Society, 2009. p. 2481-2486.

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings - With ISBN/ISSNConference contribution/Paperpeer-review

Harvard

To, M, Troscianko, T & Tolhurst, DJ 2009, Music and natural image processing share a common feature-integration rule. in CogSci 2009. Cognitive Science Society, pp. 2481-2486, Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, United Kingdom, 20/09/13. <http://csjarchive.cogsci.rpi.edu/proceedings/2009/papers/569/index.html>

APA

To, M., Troscianko, T., & Tolhurst, D. J. (2009). Music and natural image processing share a common feature-integration rule. In CogSci 2009 (pp. 2481-2486). Cognitive Science Society. http://csjarchive.cogsci.rpi.edu/proceedings/2009/papers/569/index.html

Vancouver

To M, Troscianko T, Tolhurst DJ. Music and natural image processing share a common feature-integration rule. In CogSci 2009. Cognitive Science Society. 2009. p. 2481-2486

Author

To, Michelle ; Troscianko, Tom ; Tolhurst, David J. / Music and natural image processing share a common feature-integration rule. CogSci 2009. Cognitive Science Society, 2009. pp. 2481-2486

Bibtex

@inproceedings{9e3d9d635f9b4457978308bc989b08cd,
title = "Music and natural image processing share a common feature-integration rule",
abstract = "The world is rich in sensory information, and the challenge for any neural sensory system is to piece together the diverse messages from large arrays of feature detectors. In vision and auditory research, there has been speculation about the rules governing combination of signals from different neural channels: e.g. linear (city-block) addition, Euclidian (energy) summation, or a maximum rule. These are all special cases of a more general Minkowski summation rule (Cue1^m+Cue2^m)^(1/m), where m=1, 2 and infinity respectively. Recently, we reported that Minkowski summation with exponent m=2.84 accurately models combination of visual cues in photographs [To et al. (2008). Proc Roy Soc B, 275, 2299]. Here, we ask whether this rule is equally applicable to cue combinations across different auditory dimensions: such as intensity, pitch, timbre and content. We found that in suprathreshold discrimination tasks using musical sequences, a Minkowski summation with exponent close to 3 (m=2.95) outperformed city-block, Euclidian or maximum combination rules in describing cue integration across feature dimensions. That the same exponent is found in this music experiment and our previous vision experiments, suggests the possibility of a universal “Minkowski summation Law” in sensory feature integration. We postulate that this particular Minkowski exponent relates to the degree of correlation in activity between different sensory neurons when stimulated by natural stimuli, and could reflect an overall economical and efficient encoding mechanism underlying perceptual integration of features in the natural world.",
author = "Michelle To and Tom Troscianko and Tolhurst, {David J.}",
year = "2009",
month = jul,
language = "English",
pages = "2481--2486",
booktitle = "CogSci 2009",
publisher = "Cognitive Science Society",
note = "Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society ; Conference date: 20-09-2013",

}

RIS

TY - GEN

T1 - Music and natural image processing share a common feature-integration rule

AU - To, Michelle

AU - Troscianko, Tom

AU - Tolhurst, David J.

PY - 2009/7

Y1 - 2009/7

N2 - The world is rich in sensory information, and the challenge for any neural sensory system is to piece together the diverse messages from large arrays of feature detectors. In vision and auditory research, there has been speculation about the rules governing combination of signals from different neural channels: e.g. linear (city-block) addition, Euclidian (energy) summation, or a maximum rule. These are all special cases of a more general Minkowski summation rule (Cue1^m+Cue2^m)^(1/m), where m=1, 2 and infinity respectively. Recently, we reported that Minkowski summation with exponent m=2.84 accurately models combination of visual cues in photographs [To et al. (2008). Proc Roy Soc B, 275, 2299]. Here, we ask whether this rule is equally applicable to cue combinations across different auditory dimensions: such as intensity, pitch, timbre and content. We found that in suprathreshold discrimination tasks using musical sequences, a Minkowski summation with exponent close to 3 (m=2.95) outperformed city-block, Euclidian or maximum combination rules in describing cue integration across feature dimensions. That the same exponent is found in this music experiment and our previous vision experiments, suggests the possibility of a universal “Minkowski summation Law” in sensory feature integration. We postulate that this particular Minkowski exponent relates to the degree of correlation in activity between different sensory neurons when stimulated by natural stimuli, and could reflect an overall economical and efficient encoding mechanism underlying perceptual integration of features in the natural world.

AB - The world is rich in sensory information, and the challenge for any neural sensory system is to piece together the diverse messages from large arrays of feature detectors. In vision and auditory research, there has been speculation about the rules governing combination of signals from different neural channels: e.g. linear (city-block) addition, Euclidian (energy) summation, or a maximum rule. These are all special cases of a more general Minkowski summation rule (Cue1^m+Cue2^m)^(1/m), where m=1, 2 and infinity respectively. Recently, we reported that Minkowski summation with exponent m=2.84 accurately models combination of visual cues in photographs [To et al. (2008). Proc Roy Soc B, 275, 2299]. Here, we ask whether this rule is equally applicable to cue combinations across different auditory dimensions: such as intensity, pitch, timbre and content. We found that in suprathreshold discrimination tasks using musical sequences, a Minkowski summation with exponent close to 3 (m=2.95) outperformed city-block, Euclidian or maximum combination rules in describing cue integration across feature dimensions. That the same exponent is found in this music experiment and our previous vision experiments, suggests the possibility of a universal “Minkowski summation Law” in sensory feature integration. We postulate that this particular Minkowski exponent relates to the degree of correlation in activity between different sensory neurons when stimulated by natural stimuli, and could reflect an overall economical and efficient encoding mechanism underlying perceptual integration of features in the natural world.

M3 - Conference contribution/Paper

SP - 2481

EP - 2486

BT - CogSci 2009

PB - Cognitive Science Society

T2 - Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society

Y2 - 20 September 2013

ER -