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Non-parametric hazard versus non-parametric frailty distribution in modelling recurrence of breast-cancer.

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Non-parametric hazard versus non-parametric frailty distribution in modelling recurrence of breast-cancer. / dos Santos, Dirley M.; Davies, Richard B.; Francis, Brian J.

In: Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference, Vol. 47, No. 1-2, 01.10.1995, p. 111-127.

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dos Santos, DM, Davies, RB & Francis, BJ 1995, 'Non-parametric hazard versus non-parametric frailty distribution in modelling recurrence of breast-cancer.', Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference, vol. 47, no. 1-2, pp. 111-127. https://doi.org/10.1016/0378-3758(94)00125-F

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dos Santos, Dirley M. ; Davies, Richard B. ; Francis, Brian J. / Non-parametric hazard versus non-parametric frailty distribution in modelling recurrence of breast-cancer. In: Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference. 1995 ; Vol. 47, No. 1-2. pp. 111-127.

Bibtex

@article{e72cbab1bec741fcbaa4c84b494da2a5,
title = "Non-parametric hazard versus non-parametric frailty distribution in modelling recurrence of breast-cancer.",
abstract = "In extending survival models to include frailty effects, the relative merits of parametric and nonparametric formulations are unclear. The epidemiological emphasis (Clayton, Statist. in Med. 7 (1988) 819–841) has been upon nonparametric specification of conditional effects while, within econometrics (Heckman and Singer, Longitudinal Analysis of Labor Market Data (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1985) 39–110) there has been some concern with the nonparametric specification of residual heterogeneity. This paper illustrates and examines some of the issues that arise in applying frailty models to the recurrence of breast cancer. The results suggest marginal advantage for the {\textquoteleft}econometric{\textquoteright} approach provided that there is no interest per se in the frailty distribution. However, it is important to adopt a flexible parametric specification for the conditional hazard and to allow different shaped hazard functions for successive durations.",
keywords = "Frailty, Survival model, Piecewise exponential, Profile log-likelihood, Non-parametric mixing distribution, Recurrent events",
author = "{dos Santos}, {Dirley M.} and Davies, {Richard B.} and Francis, {Brian J.}",
year = "1995",
month = oct,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0378-3758(94)00125-F",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "111--127",
journal = "Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference",
issn = "0378-3758",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1-2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Non-parametric hazard versus non-parametric frailty distribution in modelling recurrence of breast-cancer.

AU - dos Santos, Dirley M.

AU - Davies, Richard B.

AU - Francis, Brian J.

PY - 1995/10/1

Y1 - 1995/10/1

N2 - In extending survival models to include frailty effects, the relative merits of parametric and nonparametric formulations are unclear. The epidemiological emphasis (Clayton, Statist. in Med. 7 (1988) 819–841) has been upon nonparametric specification of conditional effects while, within econometrics (Heckman and Singer, Longitudinal Analysis of Labor Market Data (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1985) 39–110) there has been some concern with the nonparametric specification of residual heterogeneity. This paper illustrates and examines some of the issues that arise in applying frailty models to the recurrence of breast cancer. The results suggest marginal advantage for the ‘econometric’ approach provided that there is no interest per se in the frailty distribution. However, it is important to adopt a flexible parametric specification for the conditional hazard and to allow different shaped hazard functions for successive durations.

AB - In extending survival models to include frailty effects, the relative merits of parametric and nonparametric formulations are unclear. The epidemiological emphasis (Clayton, Statist. in Med. 7 (1988) 819–841) has been upon nonparametric specification of conditional effects while, within econometrics (Heckman and Singer, Longitudinal Analysis of Labor Market Data (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1985) 39–110) there has been some concern with the nonparametric specification of residual heterogeneity. This paper illustrates and examines some of the issues that arise in applying frailty models to the recurrence of breast cancer. The results suggest marginal advantage for the ‘econometric’ approach provided that there is no interest per se in the frailty distribution. However, it is important to adopt a flexible parametric specification for the conditional hazard and to allow different shaped hazard functions for successive durations.

KW - Frailty

KW - Survival model

KW - Piecewise exponential

KW - Profile log-likelihood

KW - Non-parametric mixing distribution

KW - Recurrent events

U2 - 10.1016/0378-3758(94)00125-F

DO - 10.1016/0378-3758(94)00125-F

M3 - Journal article

VL - 47

SP - 111

EP - 127

JO - Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference

JF - Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference

SN - 0378-3758

IS - 1-2

ER -