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Objects: Dynamics of display

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Objects: Dynamics of display. / Robin, S.A.

Approaching Historical Sources in their Contexts: Space, Time and Performance. Taylor and Francis, 2020. p. 166-181.

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Harvard

Robin, SA 2020, Objects: Dynamics of display. in Approaching Historical Sources in their Contexts: Space, Time and Performance. Taylor and Francis, pp. 166-181. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351106573-10

APA

Robin, S. A. (2020). Objects: Dynamics of display. In Approaching Historical Sources in their Contexts: Space, Time and Performance (pp. 166-181). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351106573-10

Vancouver

Robin SA. Objects: Dynamics of display. In Approaching Historical Sources in their Contexts: Space, Time and Performance. Taylor and Francis. 2020. p. 166-181 https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351106573-10

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Robin, S.A. / Objects: Dynamics of display. Approaching Historical Sources in their Contexts: Space, Time and Performance. Taylor and Francis, 2020. pp. 166-181

Bibtex

@inbook{df06b4c294c54cbc907e4e28da3af5e1,
title = "Objects: Dynamics of display",
abstract = "This chapter explores a researcher{\textquoteright}s early experiences with objects and the spaces of display around them. The chapter outlines a method and strategies for accessing and analysing material culture. Students will be able to apply this method to their own studies, adapting and changing it as circumstances demand. Experiences recorded in the chapter include interactions with trusts and institutions, curators and volunteers, as well as meetings with eccentrics, dogs and ghosts. The structure offers a chronological framework, charting a scholar{\textquoteright}s journey from the creation of criteria, to discovery, contact and meeting the objects. The central focus of the chapter is the object, and from the object I engage with space, scholar, location, identity and emotion. The methods and language that allow scholars to harness this multifaceted nature forms a continual thread, and I analyse where the historian fits into this process. In this article and the field of material culture, the scholar is acknowledged as central to the selection, direction and interpretation of the source, alongside the curators and keepers of the objects. {\textcopyright} 2020 selection and editorial matter, Sarah Barber and Corinna M. Peniston-Bird; individual chapters, the contributors.",
author = "S.A. Robin",
note = "Export Date: 24 June 2021 Correspondence Address: Robin, S.A.; Lancaster UniversityUnited Kingdom References: Deetz, J., (1996) In Small Things Forgotten: An Archaeology of Early American Life, p. 11. , New York: Anchor Books; Hood, A.D., Material culture: The object (2009) Beyond the Text: A Student{\textquoteright}s Guide to Approaching Alternative Sources, p. 187. , Sarah Barber and Corinna M. Peniston-Bird (eds), , London: Routledge; Downes, S., Holloway, S., Randles, S., (2018) Feeling Things: Objects and Emotions through History, , Oxford: Oxford University Press; Gerritsen, A., Riello, G., (2014) Writing Material Culture History, , London: Bloomsbury; Hannan, L., Longair, S., (2017) History Through Material Cul-ture, , Manchester: Manchester University Press; Hamling, T., Richardson, C., (2010) Everyday Objects: Medieval and Early Modern Mate-rial Culture and Its Meanings, , Farnham: Ashgate; Miller, D., (2010) Stuff, , Cambridge: Polity Press; Appadurai, A., (1988) The Social Life of Things: Commodities of Cultural Perspective, , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; Friedel, R., Some Matters of Substance (1993) His-tory From Things: Essays on Material Culture, pp. 41-50. , W. D. Kingery and S. Lubar (eds), , London: Smithsonian Institution Press; Robin, S.A., (2016) Pictures, posies and promises: Love, the object and the English in the sev-enteenth century, , Unpublished doctoral thesis, PhD in History, Lancaster University, UK; Woodward, I., (2007) Understanding Material Culture, pp. 3-4. , London: Sage; Richardson, C., Hamling, T., Gaimster, D., (2016) Routledge Handbook of Material Culture Studies in Early Modern Europe, , Abingdon, NY: Routledge; Robin, S.A., Male choice and desire: Material offerings in seventeenth-century Eng-land (2019) Cultural and Social History, pp. 1-16. , https://doi.org/10.1080/14780038.2019.16400, [Printed issue forthcoming Autumn 2019]; Gerritsen, A., Riello, G., (2015) The Global Lives of Things: The Material Culture of Connections in the Early Modern World, p. 6. , Abingdon, NY: Routledge; Lemire, B., (2018) Global Trade and the Transformation of Consumer Cultures: The Material World Remade, c.1500-1820, , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, chapter 6; Welch, E., (2009) Shopping in the Renaissance: Consumer Cultures in Italy, 1400-1600, , New Haven, CT: Yale University Press; O{\textquoteright}Malley, M., Welch, E., (2010) The Mate-rial Renaissance, , Manchester: Manchester University Press; Lubar, S.D., Kingery, W.D., (1993) History From Things: Essays on Material Cul-ture, , Washington DC: Smithsonian Press; Hannan, L., Longair, S., (2017) History through Material Culture, , Manchester: Manchester University Press; Find-len, P., (2012) Early Modern Things: Objects and Their Histories, 1500-1800, , Abingdon, NY: Routledge; Gerritsen, A., Riello, G., (2015) Writing Material Culture History, , Bloomsbury Academic: London; For example, Hamling, T., (2010) Decorating the Godly Household: Religious Art in Post Ref-ormation Britain, , London: Yale University Press; Miller, M., Introduction: Mate-rial culture and catholic history (2015) The Catholic Historical Review, 101 (1), pp. 1-17; Gordon, A., Rist, T., (2016) The Arts of Remembrance in Early Mod-ern England: Memorial Cultures of the Post Reformation, , London: Routledge; Llewellyn, N., (1991) The Art of Death: Visual Culture in the English Death Ritual c.1500- c.1800, , London: Reaktion Books Ltd; Yonan, M., Toward a fusion of art history and material culture studies (2011) West 86th: A Journal of Decorative Arts, Design History, and Material Culture, 18 (2), pp. 232-248; Jordanova, L., (2012) The Look of the Past: Visual and Material Evidence in Historical Prac-tice, p. 1. , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; Skelly, J., (2014) The Uses of Excess in Visual and Material Culture 1600-2010, , Abing-don, NY: Routledge; Berns, S., Considering the glass case: Material encounters between museums, visitors and religious objects (2016) Journal of Material Culture, 21 (2), pp. 153-168; Smith, K., Hannan, L., Return and repetition: Methods for material culture studies (2017) Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 48 (1), pp. 43-59 and 48; Coombs, K., (1998) The Portrait Miniature in England, , London: V&A Publications; Boettcher, G.C., (2012) The Look of Love: Eye Miniatures From the Skier Collection, , London: D. Giles; Woodward, S., Object interviews, material imaginings and “unsettling” methods: Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding materials and material culture (2015) Qualita-tive Research, 16 (4), pp. 359-374; Fritsch, J., (2011) Museum Gallery Interpretation and Material Culture, , New York: Routledge, introduction; Harvey, K., (2017) History and Material Culture: A Student{\textquoteright}s Guide to Approaching Alternative Sources, , London: Routledge; Barber, S., Peniston-Bird, C.M., (2008) History beyond the Text: A Student{\textquoteright}s Guide to Approaching Alternative Sources, , London: Routledge; Freeman, C., (2011) Holy Bones, Holy Dust: How Relics Shaped the History of Medieval Europe, , New Haven, CT: Yale University Press; Walsham, A., Skeletons in the cupboard: Relics after the English reformation (2010) Past and Present, 5, pp. 121-143. , Supplement; Lutz, D., The dead still among us: Victorian secular relics, hair jewelry, and death culture (2011) Victorian Literature and Culture, 39, pp. 127-142; Lithgow, K., Staniforth, S., Etheridge, P., Prioritizing access in the conser-vation of national trust collections (2008) Studies in Conservation, 53 (sup.1), pp. 178-185; Vargas, M.A., Pondering dysfunctions in heritage protection: Lessons from the theft of the codex calixtinus (2014) International Journal of Cultural Property, 21 (1), pp. 1-21; Jones, J., Ivory tells the history of the world: It must never be banned (2017) The Guardian, , 16 February; Hahn, H.P., Weis, H., (2013) Mobility, Meaning and Transformations of Things: Shift-ing Contexts of Material Culture through Time and Space, , Oxford: Oxbow Books, preface; Musson, J., (2005) How to Read a Country House, pp. 103-104. , London: Ebury; Musson, J., Sizergh castle, cumbria celebrates the reinstallation of the Castle{\textquoteright}s famous room of Elizabethan Inlaid panelling (2000) Country Life, , London; Goodall, I., Privacy, display and over extension: Walter strickland{\textquoteright}s rebuilding of siz-ergh (2002) The Antiquaries Journal, 82, pp. 197-245. , September; Jenkins, T., (2011) Contesting Human Remains in Museum Collections, , New York: Routledge; Ndlovu-Gatsheni, S., Decolonising research methodology must include undoing its dirty history (2017) Journal of Public Administration, 52 (1), pp. 186-188. , March; Wintle, C., Decolonising the museum: The case of the Imperial and Commonwealth Institutes (2013) Museum and Society, 11 (2), pp. 185-201. , July; Morall, A., Watt, M., (2009) English Embroidery From the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1580-1700: “Twixt Art and Nature”, , New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art",
year = "2020",
month = apr,
day = "13",
doi = "10.4324/9781351106573-10",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781351106566 ",
pages = "166--181",
booktitle = "Approaching Historical Sources in their Contexts: Space, Time and Performance",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Objects: Dynamics of display

AU - Robin, S.A.

N1 - Export Date: 24 June 2021 Correspondence Address: Robin, S.A.; Lancaster UniversityUnited Kingdom References: Deetz, J., (1996) In Small Things Forgotten: An Archaeology of Early American Life, p. 11. , New York: Anchor Books; Hood, A.D., Material culture: The object (2009) Beyond the Text: A Student’s Guide to Approaching Alternative Sources, p. 187. , Sarah Barber and Corinna M. Peniston-Bird (eds), , London: Routledge; Downes, S., Holloway, S., Randles, S., (2018) Feeling Things: Objects and Emotions through History, , Oxford: Oxford University Press; Gerritsen, A., Riello, G., (2014) Writing Material Culture History, , London: Bloomsbury; Hannan, L., Longair, S., (2017) History Through Material Cul-ture, , Manchester: Manchester University Press; Hamling, T., Richardson, C., (2010) Everyday Objects: Medieval and Early Modern Mate-rial Culture and Its Meanings, , Farnham: Ashgate; Miller, D., (2010) Stuff, , Cambridge: Polity Press; Appadurai, A., (1988) The Social Life of Things: Commodities of Cultural Perspective, , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; Friedel, R., Some Matters of Substance (1993) His-tory From Things: Essays on Material Culture, pp. 41-50. , W. D. Kingery and S. Lubar (eds), , London: Smithsonian Institution Press; Robin, S.A., (2016) Pictures, posies and promises: Love, the object and the English in the sev-enteenth century, , Unpublished doctoral thesis, PhD in History, Lancaster University, UK; Woodward, I., (2007) Understanding Material Culture, pp. 3-4. , London: Sage; Richardson, C., Hamling, T., Gaimster, D., (2016) Routledge Handbook of Material Culture Studies in Early Modern Europe, , Abingdon, NY: Routledge; Robin, S.A., Male choice and desire: Material offerings in seventeenth-century Eng-land (2019) Cultural and Social History, pp. 1-16. , https://doi.org/10.1080/14780038.2019.16400, [Printed issue forthcoming Autumn 2019]; Gerritsen, A., Riello, G., (2015) The Global Lives of Things: The Material Culture of Connections in the Early Modern World, p. 6. , Abingdon, NY: Routledge; Lemire, B., (2018) Global Trade and the Transformation of Consumer Cultures: The Material World Remade, c.1500-1820, , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, chapter 6; Welch, E., (2009) Shopping in the Renaissance: Consumer Cultures in Italy, 1400-1600, , New Haven, CT: Yale University Press; O’Malley, M., Welch, E., (2010) The Mate-rial Renaissance, , Manchester: Manchester University Press; Lubar, S.D., Kingery, W.D., (1993) History From Things: Essays on Material Cul-ture, , Washington DC: Smithsonian Press; Hannan, L., Longair, S., (2017) History through Material Culture, , Manchester: Manchester University Press; Find-len, P., (2012) Early Modern Things: Objects and Their Histories, 1500-1800, , Abingdon, NY: Routledge; Gerritsen, A., Riello, G., (2015) Writing Material Culture History, , Bloomsbury Academic: London; For example, Hamling, T., (2010) Decorating the Godly Household: Religious Art in Post Ref-ormation Britain, , London: Yale University Press; Miller, M., Introduction: Mate-rial culture and catholic history (2015) The Catholic Historical Review, 101 (1), pp. 1-17; Gordon, A., Rist, T., (2016) The Arts of Remembrance in Early Mod-ern England: Memorial Cultures of the Post Reformation, , London: Routledge; Llewellyn, N., (1991) The Art of Death: Visual Culture in the English Death Ritual c.1500- c.1800, , London: Reaktion Books Ltd; Yonan, M., Toward a fusion of art history and material culture studies (2011) West 86th: A Journal of Decorative Arts, Design History, and Material Culture, 18 (2), pp. 232-248; Jordanova, L., (2012) The Look of the Past: Visual and Material Evidence in Historical Prac-tice, p. 1. , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; Skelly, J., (2014) The Uses of Excess in Visual and Material Culture 1600-2010, , Abing-don, NY: Routledge; Berns, S., Considering the glass case: Material encounters between museums, visitors and religious objects (2016) Journal of Material Culture, 21 (2), pp. 153-168; Smith, K., Hannan, L., Return and repetition: Methods for material culture studies (2017) Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 48 (1), pp. 43-59 and 48; Coombs, K., (1998) The Portrait Miniature in England, , London: V&A Publications; Boettcher, G.C., (2012) The Look of Love: Eye Miniatures From the Skier Collection, , London: D. Giles; Woodward, S., Object interviews, material imaginings and “unsettling” methods: Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding materials and material culture (2015) Qualita-tive Research, 16 (4), pp. 359-374; Fritsch, J., (2011) Museum Gallery Interpretation and Material Culture, , New York: Routledge, introduction; Harvey, K., (2017) History and Material Culture: A Student’s Guide to Approaching Alternative Sources, , London: Routledge; Barber, S., Peniston-Bird, C.M., (2008) History beyond the Text: A Student’s Guide to Approaching Alternative Sources, , London: Routledge; Freeman, C., (2011) Holy Bones, Holy Dust: How Relics Shaped the History of Medieval Europe, , New Haven, CT: Yale University Press; Walsham, A., Skeletons in the cupboard: Relics after the English reformation (2010) Past and Present, 5, pp. 121-143. , Supplement; Lutz, D., The dead still among us: Victorian secular relics, hair jewelry, and death culture (2011) Victorian Literature and Culture, 39, pp. 127-142; Lithgow, K., Staniforth, S., Etheridge, P., Prioritizing access in the conser-vation of national trust collections (2008) Studies in Conservation, 53 (sup.1), pp. 178-185; Vargas, M.A., Pondering dysfunctions in heritage protection: Lessons from the theft of the codex calixtinus (2014) International Journal of Cultural Property, 21 (1), pp. 1-21; Jones, J., Ivory tells the history of the world: It must never be banned (2017) The Guardian, , 16 February; Hahn, H.P., Weis, H., (2013) Mobility, Meaning and Transformations of Things: Shift-ing Contexts of Material Culture through Time and Space, , Oxford: Oxbow Books, preface; Musson, J., (2005) How to Read a Country House, pp. 103-104. , London: Ebury; Musson, J., Sizergh castle, cumbria celebrates the reinstallation of the Castle’s famous room of Elizabethan Inlaid panelling (2000) Country Life, , London; Goodall, I., Privacy, display and over extension: Walter strickland’s rebuilding of siz-ergh (2002) The Antiquaries Journal, 82, pp. 197-245. , September; Jenkins, T., (2011) Contesting Human Remains in Museum Collections, , New York: Routledge; Ndlovu-Gatsheni, S., Decolonising research methodology must include undoing its dirty history (2017) Journal of Public Administration, 52 (1), pp. 186-188. , March; Wintle, C., Decolonising the museum: The case of the Imperial and Commonwealth Institutes (2013) Museum and Society, 11 (2), pp. 185-201. , July; Morall, A., Watt, M., (2009) English Embroidery From the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1580-1700: “Twixt Art and Nature”, , New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art

PY - 2020/4/13

Y1 - 2020/4/13

N2 - This chapter explores a researcher’s early experiences with objects and the spaces of display around them. The chapter outlines a method and strategies for accessing and analysing material culture. Students will be able to apply this method to their own studies, adapting and changing it as circumstances demand. Experiences recorded in the chapter include interactions with trusts and institutions, curators and volunteers, as well as meetings with eccentrics, dogs and ghosts. The structure offers a chronological framework, charting a scholar’s journey from the creation of criteria, to discovery, contact and meeting the objects. The central focus of the chapter is the object, and from the object I engage with space, scholar, location, identity and emotion. The methods and language that allow scholars to harness this multifaceted nature forms a continual thread, and I analyse where the historian fits into this process. In this article and the field of material culture, the scholar is acknowledged as central to the selection, direction and interpretation of the source, alongside the curators and keepers of the objects. © 2020 selection and editorial matter, Sarah Barber and Corinna M. Peniston-Bird; individual chapters, the contributors.

AB - This chapter explores a researcher’s early experiences with objects and the spaces of display around them. The chapter outlines a method and strategies for accessing and analysing material culture. Students will be able to apply this method to their own studies, adapting and changing it as circumstances demand. Experiences recorded in the chapter include interactions with trusts and institutions, curators and volunteers, as well as meetings with eccentrics, dogs and ghosts. The structure offers a chronological framework, charting a scholar’s journey from the creation of criteria, to discovery, contact and meeting the objects. The central focus of the chapter is the object, and from the object I engage with space, scholar, location, identity and emotion. The methods and language that allow scholars to harness this multifaceted nature forms a continual thread, and I analyse where the historian fits into this process. In this article and the field of material culture, the scholar is acknowledged as central to the selection, direction and interpretation of the source, alongside the curators and keepers of the objects. © 2020 selection and editorial matter, Sarah Barber and Corinna M. Peniston-Bird; individual chapters, the contributors.

U2 - 10.4324/9781351106573-10

DO - 10.4324/9781351106573-10

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781351106566

SP - 166

EP - 181

BT - Approaching Historical Sources in their Contexts: Space, Time and Performance

PB - Taylor and Francis

ER -