Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Optical calibration of the SNO+ detector in the...

Electronic data

  • JINST_023P_0621

    Rights statement: This is an author-created, un-copyedited version of an article accepted for publication/published in Journal of Instrumentation. IOP Publishing Ltd is not responsible for any errors or omissions in this version of the manuscript or any version derived from it. The Version of Record is available online at doi:10.1088/1748-0221/16/10/P10021

    Accepted author manuscript, 1.72 MB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 19/10/22

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Optical calibration of the SNO+ detector in the water phase with deployed sources

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
Article numberP10021
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>19/10/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Instrumentation
Issue number10
Volume16
Number of pages29
Publication StatusPublished
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

SNO+ is a large-scale liquid scintillator experiment with the primary goal of searching for neutrinoless double beta decay, and is located approximately 2 km underground in SNOLAB, Sudbury, Canada. The detector acquired data for two years as a pure water Cherenkov detector, starting in May 2017. During this period, the optical properties of the detector were measured in situ using a deployed light diffusing sphere, with the goal of improving the detector model and the energy response systematic uncertainties. The measured parameters included the water attenuation coefficients, effective attenuation coefficients for the acrylic vessel, and the angular response of the photomultiplier tubes and their surrounding light concentrators, all across different wavelengths. The calibrated detector model was validated using a deployed tagged gamma source, which showed a 0.6% variation in energy scale across the primary target volume.

Bibliographic note

This is an author-created, un-copyedited version of an article accepted for publication/published in Journal of Instrumentation. IOP Publishing Ltd is not responsible for any errors or omissions in this version of the manuscript or any version derived from it. The Version of Record is available online at doi:10.1088/1748-0221/16/10/P10021