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Poles Apart?: The Extent of Similarity between Online Extremist and Non-Extremist Message Content

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Poles Apart? The Extent of Similarity between Online Extremist and Non-Extremist Message Content. / Prentice, Sheryl; Taylor, Paul.

In: Frontiers in Psychology, Vol. 12, 776985, 19.11.2021.

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@article{b949d00ae67d434fa2688dcb96132257,
title = "Poles Apart?: The Extent of Similarity between Online Extremist and Non-Extremist Message Content",
abstract = "Within studies of extremism, extremist and non-extremist messages are generally treated as two sets of competing constructed narratives. However, some research has argued that these message forms are not dichotomous and that non-extremist narratives demonstrate overlap with extremist master narratives. The aim of this paper is to test this hypothesis empirically by comparing 250 extremist, 250 mainstream and 250 counter-extremist messages. The paper finds considerable overlap between extremist and non-extremist material. However, an analysis of underlying content suggests that this overlap may not be so much due to the extensive adoption of an extremist master narrative by non-extremist authors, but rather a question of resistance and positioning, specifically, who are authors resisting and why? The findings have implications for counter-extremism policy.",
keywords = "extremism, counter-extremism, mainstream, (dis)similarity, positioning, resistance",
author = "Sheryl Prentice and Paul Taylor",
year = "2021",
month = nov,
day = "19",
doi = "10.3389/fpsyg.2021.776985",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
journal = "Frontiers in Psychology",
issn = "1664-1078",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S.A.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Poles Apart?

T2 - The Extent of Similarity between Online Extremist and Non-Extremist Message Content

AU - Prentice, Sheryl

AU - Taylor, Paul

PY - 2021/11/19

Y1 - 2021/11/19

N2 - Within studies of extremism, extremist and non-extremist messages are generally treated as two sets of competing constructed narratives. However, some research has argued that these message forms are not dichotomous and that non-extremist narratives demonstrate overlap with extremist master narratives. The aim of this paper is to test this hypothesis empirically by comparing 250 extremist, 250 mainstream and 250 counter-extremist messages. The paper finds considerable overlap between extremist and non-extremist material. However, an analysis of underlying content suggests that this overlap may not be so much due to the extensive adoption of an extremist master narrative by non-extremist authors, but rather a question of resistance and positioning, specifically, who are authors resisting and why? The findings have implications for counter-extremism policy.

AB - Within studies of extremism, extremist and non-extremist messages are generally treated as two sets of competing constructed narratives. However, some research has argued that these message forms are not dichotomous and that non-extremist narratives demonstrate overlap with extremist master narratives. The aim of this paper is to test this hypothesis empirically by comparing 250 extremist, 250 mainstream and 250 counter-extremist messages. The paper finds considerable overlap between extremist and non-extremist material. However, an analysis of underlying content suggests that this overlap may not be so much due to the extensive adoption of an extremist master narrative by non-extremist authors, but rather a question of resistance and positioning, specifically, who are authors resisting and why? The findings have implications for counter-extremism policy.

KW - extremism

KW - counter-extremism

KW - mainstream

KW - (dis)similarity

KW - positioning

KW - resistance

U2 - 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.776985

DO - 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.776985

M3 - Journal article

VL - 12

JO - Frontiers in Psychology

JF - Frontiers in Psychology

SN - 1664-1078

M1 - 776985

ER -