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Poverty transitions among families supporting a child with intellectual disability

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Poverty transitions among families supporting a child with intellectual disability. / Emerson, Eric; Shahtahmasebi, Said; Berridge, Damon; Lancaster, Gillian.

In: Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, Vol. 35, No. 4, 12.2010, p. 224-234.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Emerson, E, Shahtahmasebi, S, Berridge, D & Lancaster, G 2010, 'Poverty transitions among families supporting a child with intellectual disability', Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 224-234. https://doi.org/10.3109/13668250.2010.518562

APA

Vancouver

Author

Emerson, Eric ; Shahtahmasebi, Said ; Berridge, Damon ; Lancaster, Gillian. / Poverty transitions among families supporting a child with intellectual disability. In: Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability. 2010 ; Vol. 35, No. 4. pp. 224-234.

Bibtex

@article{586ce224b3b6498eb9178f8b4ffe72e6,
title = "Poverty transitions among families supporting a child with intellectual disability",
abstract = "Background Little is known about child disability and dynamic aspects of poverty.Method Analysis of data collected over a 12-month period for families (a) supporting a child with intellectual disability (n = 370), (b) supporting a child with other disability (n = 1,418), and (c) supporting a child with no disability (n = 7,215).Results When compared to families not supporting a child with disability, families supporting a child with intellectual disability were (a) more likely to be poor, (b) more likely to become poor, (c) less likely to escape from being poor. Half of poverty transitions were associated with identifiable potential trigger events.Conclusions There were few differences between families supporting or not supporting a child with disability with regard to either levels of exposure to potential trigger events or to the strength of the association between exposure and poverty transitions.",
keywords = "poverty, hardship , children , families",
author = "Eric Emerson and Said Shahtahmasebi and Damon Berridge and Gillian Lancaster",
year = "2010",
month = dec,
doi = "10.3109/13668250.2010.518562",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "224--234",
journal = "Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability",
issn = "1366-8250",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Poverty transitions among families supporting a child with intellectual disability

AU - Emerson, Eric

AU - Shahtahmasebi, Said

AU - Berridge, Damon

AU - Lancaster, Gillian

PY - 2010/12

Y1 - 2010/12

N2 - Background Little is known about child disability and dynamic aspects of poverty.Method Analysis of data collected over a 12-month period for families (a) supporting a child with intellectual disability (n = 370), (b) supporting a child with other disability (n = 1,418), and (c) supporting a child with no disability (n = 7,215).Results When compared to families not supporting a child with disability, families supporting a child with intellectual disability were (a) more likely to be poor, (b) more likely to become poor, (c) less likely to escape from being poor. Half of poverty transitions were associated with identifiable potential trigger events.Conclusions There were few differences between families supporting or not supporting a child with disability with regard to either levels of exposure to potential trigger events or to the strength of the association between exposure and poverty transitions.

AB - Background Little is known about child disability and dynamic aspects of poverty.Method Analysis of data collected over a 12-month period for families (a) supporting a child with intellectual disability (n = 370), (b) supporting a child with other disability (n = 1,418), and (c) supporting a child with no disability (n = 7,215).Results When compared to families not supporting a child with disability, families supporting a child with intellectual disability were (a) more likely to be poor, (b) more likely to become poor, (c) less likely to escape from being poor. Half of poverty transitions were associated with identifiable potential trigger events.Conclusions There were few differences between families supporting or not supporting a child with disability with regard to either levels of exposure to potential trigger events or to the strength of the association between exposure and poverty transitions.

KW - poverty

KW - hardship

KW - children

KW - families

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78649840412&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3109/13668250.2010.518562

DO - 10.3109/13668250.2010.518562

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:78649840412

VL - 35

SP - 224

EP - 234

JO - Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability

JF - Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability

SN - 1366-8250

IS - 4

ER -