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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Seizure. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Seizure, 29, 2015 DOI: 10.1016/j.seizure.2015.03.016

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Prevalence of epilepsy among people with intellectual disabilities: a systematic review

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Prevalence of epilepsy among people with intellectual disabilities : a systematic review. / Robertson, Janet; Hatton, Chris; Emerson, Eric; Baines, Susannah.

In: Seizure - European Journal of Epilepsy, Vol. 29, 07.2015, p. 46-62.

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@article{64919d0ed2024a7e82078b0cbdc50389,
title = "Prevalence of epilepsy among people with intellectual disabilities: a systematic review",
abstract = "Purpose: Epilepsy is more common in people with intellectual disabilities than in the general population. However, reported prevalence rates vary widely between studies. This systematic review aimed to provide a summary of prevalence studies and estimates of prevalence based on meta-analyses.Method: Studies were identified via electronic searches using Medline, Cinahl and PsycINFO and cross-citations. Information extracted from studies was tabulated. Prevalence rate estimates were pooled using random effects meta-analyses and subgroup analyses were conducted.Results: A total of 48 studies were included in the tabulation and 46 studies were included in meta-analyses. In general samples of people with intellectual disabilities, the pooled estimate from 38 studies was 22.2% (95% CI 19.6-25.1). Prevalence increased with increasing level of intellectual disability. For samples of people with Down syndrome, the pooled estimate from data in 13 studies was 12.4% (95% CI 9.1-16.7), decreasing to 10.3% (95% CI 8.4-12.6) following removal of two studies focusing on older people. Prevalence increased with age in people with Down syndrome and was particularly prevalent in those with Alzheimer's/dementia.Conclusion: Epilepsy is highly prevalent in people with intellectual disabilities. Services must be equipped with the skills and information needed to manage this condition. (C) 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Epilepsy, Prevalence, Intellectual disabilities, Down syndrome, MENTALLY-RETARDED CHILDREN, HEALTH INTERVIEW SURVEY, DOWN-SYNDROME, PSYCHIATRIC-DISORDERS, SERVICE IMPLICATIONS, ADAPTIVE-BEHAVIOR, GENERAL-PRACTICE, ACTIVE EPILEPSY, OLDER-ADULTS, RETARDATION",
author = "Janet Robertson and Chris Hatton and Eric Emerson and Susannah Baines",
note = "This is the author{\textquoteright}s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Seizure. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Seizure, 29, 2015 DOI: 10.1016/j.seizure.2015.03.016",
year = "2015",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1016/j.seizure.2015.03.016",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "46--62",
journal = "Seizure - European Journal of Epilepsy",
issn = "1059-1311",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence of epilepsy among people with intellectual disabilities

T2 - a systematic review

AU - Robertson, Janet

AU - Hatton, Chris

AU - Emerson, Eric

AU - Baines, Susannah

N1 - This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Seizure. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Seizure, 29, 2015 DOI: 10.1016/j.seizure.2015.03.016

PY - 2015/7

Y1 - 2015/7

N2 - Purpose: Epilepsy is more common in people with intellectual disabilities than in the general population. However, reported prevalence rates vary widely between studies. This systematic review aimed to provide a summary of prevalence studies and estimates of prevalence based on meta-analyses.Method: Studies were identified via electronic searches using Medline, Cinahl and PsycINFO and cross-citations. Information extracted from studies was tabulated. Prevalence rate estimates were pooled using random effects meta-analyses and subgroup analyses were conducted.Results: A total of 48 studies were included in the tabulation and 46 studies were included in meta-analyses. In general samples of people with intellectual disabilities, the pooled estimate from 38 studies was 22.2% (95% CI 19.6-25.1). Prevalence increased with increasing level of intellectual disability. For samples of people with Down syndrome, the pooled estimate from data in 13 studies was 12.4% (95% CI 9.1-16.7), decreasing to 10.3% (95% CI 8.4-12.6) following removal of two studies focusing on older people. Prevalence increased with age in people with Down syndrome and was particularly prevalent in those with Alzheimer's/dementia.Conclusion: Epilepsy is highly prevalent in people with intellectual disabilities. Services must be equipped with the skills and information needed to manage this condition. (C) 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - Purpose: Epilepsy is more common in people with intellectual disabilities than in the general population. However, reported prevalence rates vary widely between studies. This systematic review aimed to provide a summary of prevalence studies and estimates of prevalence based on meta-analyses.Method: Studies were identified via electronic searches using Medline, Cinahl and PsycINFO and cross-citations. Information extracted from studies was tabulated. Prevalence rate estimates were pooled using random effects meta-analyses and subgroup analyses were conducted.Results: A total of 48 studies were included in the tabulation and 46 studies were included in meta-analyses. In general samples of people with intellectual disabilities, the pooled estimate from 38 studies was 22.2% (95% CI 19.6-25.1). Prevalence increased with increasing level of intellectual disability. For samples of people with Down syndrome, the pooled estimate from data in 13 studies was 12.4% (95% CI 9.1-16.7), decreasing to 10.3% (95% CI 8.4-12.6) following removal of two studies focusing on older people. Prevalence increased with age in people with Down syndrome and was particularly prevalent in those with Alzheimer's/dementia.Conclusion: Epilepsy is highly prevalent in people with intellectual disabilities. Services must be equipped with the skills and information needed to manage this condition. (C) 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - Epilepsy

KW - Prevalence

KW - Intellectual disabilities

KW - Down syndrome

KW - MENTALLY-RETARDED CHILDREN

KW - HEALTH INTERVIEW SURVEY

KW - DOWN-SYNDROME

KW - PSYCHIATRIC-DISORDERS

KW - SERVICE IMPLICATIONS

KW - ADAPTIVE-BEHAVIOR

KW - GENERAL-PRACTICE

KW - ACTIVE EPILEPSY

KW - OLDER-ADULTS

KW - RETARDATION

U2 - 10.1016/j.seizure.2015.03.016

DO - 10.1016/j.seizure.2015.03.016

M3 - Literature review

VL - 29

SP - 46

EP - 62

JO - Seizure - European Journal of Epilepsy

JF - Seizure - European Journal of Epilepsy

SN - 1059-1311

ER -