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    Rights statement: An edited version of this paper was published by AGU. Copyright 2017 American Geophysical Union. Ameli, A. A., K. Beven, M. Erlandsson, I. F. Creed, J. J. McDonnell and K. Bishop (2017), Primary weathering rates, water transit times, and concentration-discharge relations: A theoretical analysis for the critical zone, Water Resour. Res., 53, 942–960, doi:10.1002/2016WR019448. To view the published open abstract, go to http://dx.doi.org and enter the DOI.

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  • Ameli_et_al-2017-Water_Resources_Research

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Primary weathering rates, water transit times, and concentration-discharge relations: a theoretical analysis for the critical zone

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Primary weathering rates, water transit times, and concentration-discharge relations : a theoretical analysis for the critical zone. / Ameli, Ali A.; Beven, Keith; Erlandsson, Martin; Creed, Irena F.; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; Bishop, Kevin.

In: Water Resources Research, Vol. 53, No. 1, 01.2017, p. 942-960.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Ameli, AA, Beven, K, Erlandsson, M, Creed, IF, McDonnell, JJ & Bishop, K 2017, 'Primary weathering rates, water transit times, and concentration-discharge relations: a theoretical analysis for the critical zone', Water Resources Research, vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 942-960. https://doi.org/10.1002/2016WR019448

APA

Ameli, A. A., Beven, K., Erlandsson, M., Creed, I. F., McDonnell, J. J., & Bishop, K. (2017). Primary weathering rates, water transit times, and concentration-discharge relations: a theoretical analysis for the critical zone. Water Resources Research, 53(1), 942-960. https://doi.org/10.1002/2016WR019448

Vancouver

Author

Ameli, Ali A. ; Beven, Keith ; Erlandsson, Martin ; Creed, Irena F. ; McDonnell, Jeffrey J. ; Bishop, Kevin. / Primary weathering rates, water transit times, and concentration-discharge relations : a theoretical analysis for the critical zone. In: Water Resources Research. 2017 ; Vol. 53, No. 1. pp. 942-960.

Bibtex

@article{809e85da371446dbacd329bf88595c8e,
title = "Primary weathering rates, water transit times, and concentration-discharge relations: a theoretical analysis for the critical zone",
abstract = "The permeability architecture of the critical zone exerts a major influence on the hydrogeochemistry of the critical zone. Water flow path dynamics drive the spatiotemporal pattern of geochemical evolution and resulting streamflow concentration-discharge (C-Q) relation, but these flow paths are complex and difficult to map quantitatively. Here we couple a new integrated flow and particle tracking transport model with a general reversible Transition State Theory style dissolution rate law to explore theoretically how C-Q relations and concentration in the critical zone respond to decline in saturated hydraulic conductivity (K-s) with soil depth. We do this for a range of flow rates and mineral reaction kinetics. Our results show that for minerals with a high ratio of equilibrium concentration (C-eq) to intrinsic weathering rate (R-max), vertical heterogeneity in K-s enhances the gradient of weathering-derived solute concentration in the critical zone and strengthens the inverse stream C-Q relation. As C-eq/R-max decreases, the spatial distribution of concentration in the critical zone becomes more uniform for a wide range of flow rates, and stream C-Q relation approaches chemostatic behavior, regardless of the degree of vertical heterogeneity in K-s. These findings suggest that the transport-controlled mechanisms in the hillslope can lead to chemostatic C-Q relations in the stream while the hillslope surface reaction-controlled mechanisms are associated with an inverse stream C-Q relation. In addition, as C-eq/R-max decreases, the concentration in the critical zone and stream become less dependent on groundwater age (or transit time).",
keywords = "chemical weathering, conductivity profile, stream C-Q relation, saturated-unsaturated flow and transport, transit time, ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS, RUNOFF CHEMISTRY, SUBSURFACE FLOW, RESIDENCE TIME, STORM RUNOFF, MID-WALES, CATCHMENT, DISSOLUTION, MODEL, TRANSPORT",
author = "Ameli, {Ali A.} and Keith Beven and Martin Erlandsson and Creed, {Irena F.} and McDonnell, {Jeffrey J.} and Kevin Bishop",
note = "An edited version of this paper was published by AGU. Copyright 2017 American Geophysical Union. Ameli, A. A., K. Beven, M. Erlandsson, I. F. Creed, J. J. McDonnell and K. Bishop (2017), Primary weathering rates, water transit times, and concentration-discharge relations: A theoretical analysis for the critical zone, Water Resour. Res., 53, 942–960, doi:10.1002/2016WR019448. To view the published open abstract, go to http://dx.doi.org and enter the DOI.",
year = "2017",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1002/2016WR019448",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "942--960",
journal = "Water Resources Research",
issn = "0043-1397",
publisher = "AMER GEOPHYSICAL UNION",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Primary weathering rates, water transit times, and concentration-discharge relations

T2 - a theoretical analysis for the critical zone

AU - Ameli, Ali A.

AU - Beven, Keith

AU - Erlandsson, Martin

AU - Creed, Irena F.

AU - McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

AU - Bishop, Kevin

N1 - An edited version of this paper was published by AGU. Copyright 2017 American Geophysical Union. Ameli, A. A., K. Beven, M. Erlandsson, I. F. Creed, J. J. McDonnell and K. Bishop (2017), Primary weathering rates, water transit times, and concentration-discharge relations: A theoretical analysis for the critical zone, Water Resour. Res., 53, 942–960, doi:10.1002/2016WR019448. To view the published open abstract, go to http://dx.doi.org and enter the DOI.

PY - 2017/1

Y1 - 2017/1

N2 - The permeability architecture of the critical zone exerts a major influence on the hydrogeochemistry of the critical zone. Water flow path dynamics drive the spatiotemporal pattern of geochemical evolution and resulting streamflow concentration-discharge (C-Q) relation, but these flow paths are complex and difficult to map quantitatively. Here we couple a new integrated flow and particle tracking transport model with a general reversible Transition State Theory style dissolution rate law to explore theoretically how C-Q relations and concentration in the critical zone respond to decline in saturated hydraulic conductivity (K-s) with soil depth. We do this for a range of flow rates and mineral reaction kinetics. Our results show that for minerals with a high ratio of equilibrium concentration (C-eq) to intrinsic weathering rate (R-max), vertical heterogeneity in K-s enhances the gradient of weathering-derived solute concentration in the critical zone and strengthens the inverse stream C-Q relation. As C-eq/R-max decreases, the spatial distribution of concentration in the critical zone becomes more uniform for a wide range of flow rates, and stream C-Q relation approaches chemostatic behavior, regardless of the degree of vertical heterogeneity in K-s. These findings suggest that the transport-controlled mechanisms in the hillslope can lead to chemostatic C-Q relations in the stream while the hillslope surface reaction-controlled mechanisms are associated with an inverse stream C-Q relation. In addition, as C-eq/R-max decreases, the concentration in the critical zone and stream become less dependent on groundwater age (or transit time).

AB - The permeability architecture of the critical zone exerts a major influence on the hydrogeochemistry of the critical zone. Water flow path dynamics drive the spatiotemporal pattern of geochemical evolution and resulting streamflow concentration-discharge (C-Q) relation, but these flow paths are complex and difficult to map quantitatively. Here we couple a new integrated flow and particle tracking transport model with a general reversible Transition State Theory style dissolution rate law to explore theoretically how C-Q relations and concentration in the critical zone respond to decline in saturated hydraulic conductivity (K-s) with soil depth. We do this for a range of flow rates and mineral reaction kinetics. Our results show that for minerals with a high ratio of equilibrium concentration (C-eq) to intrinsic weathering rate (R-max), vertical heterogeneity in K-s enhances the gradient of weathering-derived solute concentration in the critical zone and strengthens the inverse stream C-Q relation. As C-eq/R-max decreases, the spatial distribution of concentration in the critical zone becomes more uniform for a wide range of flow rates, and stream C-Q relation approaches chemostatic behavior, regardless of the degree of vertical heterogeneity in K-s. These findings suggest that the transport-controlled mechanisms in the hillslope can lead to chemostatic C-Q relations in the stream while the hillslope surface reaction-controlled mechanisms are associated with an inverse stream C-Q relation. In addition, as C-eq/R-max decreases, the concentration in the critical zone and stream become less dependent on groundwater age (or transit time).

KW - chemical weathering

KW - conductivity profile

KW - stream C-Q relation

KW - saturated-unsaturated flow and transport

KW - transit time

KW - ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS

KW - RUNOFF CHEMISTRY

KW - SUBSURFACE FLOW

KW - RESIDENCE TIME

KW - STORM RUNOFF

KW - MID-WALES

KW - CATCHMENT

KW - DISSOLUTION

KW - MODEL

KW - TRANSPORT

U2 - 10.1002/2016WR019448

DO - 10.1002/2016WR019448

M3 - Journal article

VL - 53

SP - 942

EP - 960

JO - Water Resources Research

JF - Water Resources Research

SN - 0043-1397

IS - 1

ER -