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  • DCM_Brookes and Chalupnik accepted

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Discourse, Context and Media. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Discourse, Context and Media, 49, 100640, 2022 DOI: 10.1016/j.dcm.2022.100640

    Accepted author manuscript, 1.54 MB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 19/08/23

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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‘Real men grill vegetables, not dead animals’: Discourse representations of men in an online vegan community

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

E-pub ahead of print
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Article number100640
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>31/10/2022
<mark>Journal</mark>Discourse, Context and Media
Volume49
Number of pages10
Publication StatusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date19/08/22
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

This article critically examines discourse representations of men in a large online vegan community. The analysis reveals a set of discourses which provide oppositional representations of vegan and non-vegan men, wherein the former is aligned with hegemonic masculine norms and the latter represented as transgressing or falling short of these norms. We interpret these discourses as providing means for the forum members to resist societal-level discourses which frame veganism and vegan men as feminine or ‘unmanly’, while also performing a social support function of reassuring posters who express concerns about how their veganism may impact how others perceive them and their masculinity. However, we also argue that such discourses can be considered problematic from an ecofeminist perspective, as they orient to and reinforce a hegemonic gender hierarchy which has enabled, and continues to enable, gender oppression, animal exploitation and the broader destruction of the natural world.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Discourse, Context and Media. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Discourse, Context and Media, 49, 100640, 2022 DOI: 10.1016/j.dcm.2022.100640