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  • Authors Accepted Manuscript Rethinking Business Performance

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Business Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Business Research, 144, 2022 DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2022.02.012

    Accepted author manuscript, 337 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 17/08/23

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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Rethinking Business Performance in Global Value Chains

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>31/05/2022
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Business Research
Volume144
Number of pages11
Pages (from-to)679-689
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date17/02/22
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

This paper develops a theoretical foundation for rethinking business performance in global value chains amid the Covid-19 fallout. Specifically, we synthesize business performance into three potentially reinforcing but also conflicting performance systems: 1) operational efficiency, 2) market effectiveness and 3) financial resilience to examine their effect on a) profitability, b) growth and c) solvency. While some specific measures of business performance will suffice in times of stability and growth, they could make firms operating in global value chains vulnerable in times of adversity. Our comprehensive theoretical framework contributes to our understanding of the dynamic interplay of conflicting performance systems. We discuss implications for assessing business performance and provide directions for further research.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Business Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Business Research, 144, 2022 DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2022.02.012