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    Embargo ends: 14/01/23

    Available under license: CC BY: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

  • Metallofullerenes_SI

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    Embargo ends: 14/01/23

    Available under license: CC BY: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

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Room-temperature logic-in-memory operations in single-metallofullerene devices

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>8/08/2022
<mark>Journal</mark>Nature Materials
Issue number8
Volume21
Number of pages7
Pages (from-to)917-923
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date14/07/22
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

In-memory computing provides an opportunity to meet the growing demands of large data-driven applications such as machine learning, by colocating logic operations and data storage. Despite being regarded as the ultimate solution for high-density integration and low-power manipulation, the use of spin or electric dipole at the single-molecule level to realize in-memory logic functions has yet to be realized at room temperature, due to their random orientation. Here, we demonstrate logic-in-memory operations, based on single electric dipole flipping in a two-terminal single-metallofullerene (Sc2C2@Cs(hept)-C88) device at room temperature. By applying a low voltage of ±0.8 V to the single-metallofullerene junction, we found that the digital information recorded among the different dipole states could be reversibly encoded in situ and stored. As a consequence, 14 types of Boolean logic operation were shown from a single-metallofullerene device. Density functional theory calculations reveal that the non-volatile memory behaviour comes from dipole reorientation of the [Sc2C2] group in the fullerene cage. This proof-of-concept represents a major step towards room-temperature electrically manipulated, low-power, two-terminal in-memory logic devices and a direction for in-memory computing using nanoelectronic devices.