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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Critical Discourse Studies on 04/05/2021, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17405904.2021.1905015

    Accepted author manuscript, 593 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 4/11/22

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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‘Same, same but different’: representations of Chinese mainland and Hong Kong people in the press in post-1997 Hong Kong

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Published
  • Y. Lin
  • M. Chen
  • J. Flowerdew
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>31/07/2022
<mark>Journal</mark>Critical Discourse Studies
Issue number4
Volume19
Number of pages20
Pages (from-to)364-383
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date4/05/21
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

After Hong Kong’s return to Chinese Sovereignty in 1997, the terms ‘mainlander’ and ‘Hongkonger’ have been widely used by English-language media in Hong Kong to differentiate between people from the Chinese mainland and Hong Kong. This study examines representations of Chinese mainlanders and Hongkongers in a 17.4-million-token corpus containing 30,279 articles published between 1998 and 2019 by the South China Morning Post, a leading English-language newspaper in Hong Kong. By comparing the collocational behaviour of the noun lemmas mainlander and Hongkonger, the study identifies the topoi, or stereotypical characterizations, associated with the two groups. The analysis demonstrates the way in which the ‘othering’ of or sometimes discrimination against mainland migrants/visitors has served as part of the process through which the distinctive ‘Hongkongers’ identity’ is pronounced after the 1997-handover in Hong Kong’s English language newspaper of record. © 2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Critical Discourse Studies on 04/05/2021, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17405904.2021.1905015