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Social-cognitive processes in preschoolers' selective trust: Three cultures compared

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Social-cognitive processes in preschoolers' selective trust : Three cultures compared. / Lucas, Amanda J.; Lewis, Charlie; Pala, F. Cansu et al.

In: Developmental Psychology, Vol. 49, No. 3, 03.2013, p. 579-590.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Lucas, AJ, Lewis, C, Pala, FC, Wong, K & Berridge, D 2013, 'Social-cognitive processes in preschoolers' selective trust: Three cultures compared', Developmental Psychology, vol. 49, no. 3, pp. 579-590. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0029864

APA

Vancouver

Lucas AJ, Lewis C, Pala FC, Wong K, Berridge D. Social-cognitive processes in preschoolers' selective trust: Three cultures compared. Developmental Psychology. 2013 Mar;49(3):579-590. Epub 2012 Sep 3. doi: 10.1037/a0029864

Author

Lucas, Amanda J. ; Lewis, Charlie ; Pala, F. Cansu et al. / Social-cognitive processes in preschoolers' selective trust : Three cultures compared. In: Developmental Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 49, No. 3. pp. 579-590.

Bibtex

@article{0ddae8d519d14d22b8ac8f4fb46133f2,
title = "Social-cognitive processes in preschoolers' selective trust: Three cultures compared",
abstract = "Research on preschoolers' selective learning has mostly been conducted in English-speaking countries. We compared the performance of Turkish preschoolers (who are exposed to a language with evidential markers), Chinese preschoolers (known to be advanced in executive skills), and English preschoolers on an extended selective trust task (N = 144). We also measured children's executive function skills and their ability to attribute false belief. Overall we found a Turkish (rather than a Chinese) advantage in selective trust and a relationship between selective trust and false belief (rather than executive function). This is the 1st evidence that exposure to a language that obliges speakers to state the sources of their knowledge may sensitize preschoolers to informant reliability. It is also the first demonstration of an association between false belief and selective trust. Together these findings suggest that effective selective learning may progress alongside children's developing capacity to assess the knowledge of others.",
author = "Lucas, {Amanda J.} and Charlie Lewis and Pala, {F. Cansu} and Katie Wong and Damon Berridge",
year = "2013",
month = mar,
doi = "10.1037/a0029864",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "579--590",
journal = "Developmental Psychology",
issn = "0012-1649",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social-cognitive processes in preschoolers' selective trust

T2 - Three cultures compared

AU - Lucas, Amanda J.

AU - Lewis, Charlie

AU - Pala, F. Cansu

AU - Wong, Katie

AU - Berridge, Damon

PY - 2013/3

Y1 - 2013/3

N2 - Research on preschoolers' selective learning has mostly been conducted in English-speaking countries. We compared the performance of Turkish preschoolers (who are exposed to a language with evidential markers), Chinese preschoolers (known to be advanced in executive skills), and English preschoolers on an extended selective trust task (N = 144). We also measured children's executive function skills and their ability to attribute false belief. Overall we found a Turkish (rather than a Chinese) advantage in selective trust and a relationship between selective trust and false belief (rather than executive function). This is the 1st evidence that exposure to a language that obliges speakers to state the sources of their knowledge may sensitize preschoolers to informant reliability. It is also the first demonstration of an association between false belief and selective trust. Together these findings suggest that effective selective learning may progress alongside children's developing capacity to assess the knowledge of others.

AB - Research on preschoolers' selective learning has mostly been conducted in English-speaking countries. We compared the performance of Turkish preschoolers (who are exposed to a language with evidential markers), Chinese preschoolers (known to be advanced in executive skills), and English preschoolers on an extended selective trust task (N = 144). We also measured children's executive function skills and their ability to attribute false belief. Overall we found a Turkish (rather than a Chinese) advantage in selective trust and a relationship between selective trust and false belief (rather than executive function). This is the 1st evidence that exposure to a language that obliges speakers to state the sources of their knowledge may sensitize preschoolers to informant reliability. It is also the first demonstration of an association between false belief and selective trust. Together these findings suggest that effective selective learning may progress alongside children's developing capacity to assess the knowledge of others.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84877966742&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/a0029864

DO - 10.1037/a0029864

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:84877966742

VL - 49

SP - 579

EP - 590

JO - Developmental Psychology

JF - Developmental Psychology

SN - 0012-1649

IS - 3

ER -