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  • Strategy implementation LRP Final

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Long Range Planning. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Long Range Planning, ?, ?, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.lrp.2020.102064

    Accepted author manuscript, 688 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 19/11/22

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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Strategy implementation: Taking stock and moving forward

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

E-pub ahead of print
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Article number102064
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>19/11/2020
<mark>Journal</mark>Long Range Planning
Number of pages15
Publication StatusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date19/11/20
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Strategy implementation (SI) is a significant managerial, and organizational challenge as many practitioners struggle to make strategies actionable and to achieve intended results. Moreover, there is no unified body of research on SI. This is problematic for academics aiming to contribute to a research-based body of knowledge on implementation. To remedy this problem, we draw on the strategy-as-practice perspective and conceptualize SI as a particular type of ‘strategy work’, manifest in the activities, actors, and tools through which strategy is executed. This conceptual framework allows us to synthesize the fragmented literature into five implementation practices: structure and process matching, resource matching, monitoring, framing, and negotiating. We show how these implementation activities operate at different levels and involve different actors and tools. With its emphasis on what managers (and other people) do within specific structural, temporal, and material arrangements, the strategy-as-practice perspective offers exciting opportunities for future implementation research.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Long Range Planning. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Long Range Planning, ?, ?, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.lrp.2020.102064