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  • 2101.05269v1

    Rights statement: This is an author-created, un-copyedited version of an article accepted for publication/published in The Astrophysical Journal. IOP Publishing Ltd is not responsible for any errors or omissions in this version of the manuscript or any version derived from it. The Version of Record is available online at doi:10.3847/1538-4357/abf7c4

    Accepted author manuscript, 1.83 MB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 20/07/22

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Supernova Model Discrimination with Hyper-Kamiokande

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
Article number15
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>20/07/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>The Astrophysical Journal
Issue number1
Volume916
Number of pages17
Publication StatusPublished
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Core-collapse supernovae are among the most magnificent events in the observable universe. They produce many of the chemical elements necessary for life to exist and their remnants -- neutron stars and black holes -- are interesting astrophysical objects in their own right. However, despite millennia of observations and almost a century of astrophysical study, the explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae is not yet well understood. Hyper-Kamiokande is a next-generation neutrino detector that will be able to observe the neutrino flux from the next galactic core-collapse supernova in unprecedented detail. We focus on the first 500 ms of the neutrino burst, corresponding to the accretion phase, and use a newly-developed, high-precision supernova event generator to simulate Hyper-Kamiokande's response to five different supernova models. We show that Hyper-Kamiokande will be able to distinguish between these models with high accuracy for a supernova at a distance of up to 100 kpc. Once the next galactic supernova happens, this ability will be a powerful tool for guiding simulations towards a precise reproduction of the explosion mechanism observed in nature.

Bibliographic note

This is an author-created, un-copyedited version of an article accepted for publication/published in The Astrophysical Journal. IOP Publishing Ltd is not responsible for any errors or omissions in this version of the manuscript or any version derived from it. The Version of Record is available online at doi:10.3847/1538-4357/abf7c4