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    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Urban Studies, 52 (9), 2015, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2015 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Urban Studies page: http://usj.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/

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Synchronisation and commonalities in metropolitan housing market cycles

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

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Synchronisation and commonalities in metropolitan housing market cycles. / Akimov, Alexey; Stevenson, Simon; Young, James.

In: Urban Studies, Vol. 52, No. 9, 07.2015, p. 1665-1682.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Akimov, A, Stevenson, S & Young, J 2015, 'Synchronisation and commonalities in metropolitan housing market cycles', Urban Studies, vol. 52, no. 9, pp. 1665-1682. https://doi.org/10.1177/0042098014535643

APA

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Akimov, Alexey ; Stevenson, Simon ; Young, James. / Synchronisation and commonalities in metropolitan housing market cycles. In: Urban Studies. 2015 ; Vol. 52, No. 9. pp. 1665-1682.

Bibtex

@article{54257af1c9004ab096270cf62c0cefcc,
title = "Synchronisation and commonalities in metropolitan housing market cycles",
abstract = "This paper examines the degree of commonalities present in the cyclical behaviour of the eight largest metropolitan housing markets in Australia. Using two techniques originally in the business cycle literature we consider the degree of synchronisation present and secondly decompose the series{\textquoteright} into their permanent and cyclical components. Both empirical approaches reveal similar results. Sydney and Melbourne are closely related to each other and are relatively segmented from the smaller metropolitan areas. In contrast, there is substantial evidence of commonalities in the cyclical behaviour of the remaining cities, especially those on the Eastern and Southern coasts of Australia.",
keywords = "Common Cycles, Metropolitan Housing Markets, House Price Diffusion, Permanent and Transitory Components, Decomposing Cycles and Trends",
author = "Alexey Akimov and Simon Stevenson and James Young",
note = "The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Urban Studies, 52 (9), 2015, {\textcopyright} SAGE Publications Ltd, 2015 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Urban Studies page: http://usj.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/ ",
year = "2015",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1177/0042098014535643",
language = "English",
volume = "52",
pages = "1665--1682",
journal = "Urban Studies",
issn = "0042-0980",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "9",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Synchronisation and commonalities in metropolitan housing market cycles

AU - Akimov, Alexey

AU - Stevenson, Simon

AU - Young, James

N1 - The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Urban Studies, 52 (9), 2015, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2015 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Urban Studies page: http://usj.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/

PY - 2015/7

Y1 - 2015/7

N2 - This paper examines the degree of commonalities present in the cyclical behaviour of the eight largest metropolitan housing markets in Australia. Using two techniques originally in the business cycle literature we consider the degree of synchronisation present and secondly decompose the series’ into their permanent and cyclical components. Both empirical approaches reveal similar results. Sydney and Melbourne are closely related to each other and are relatively segmented from the smaller metropolitan areas. In contrast, there is substantial evidence of commonalities in the cyclical behaviour of the remaining cities, especially those on the Eastern and Southern coasts of Australia.

AB - This paper examines the degree of commonalities present in the cyclical behaviour of the eight largest metropolitan housing markets in Australia. Using two techniques originally in the business cycle literature we consider the degree of synchronisation present and secondly decompose the series’ into their permanent and cyclical components. Both empirical approaches reveal similar results. Sydney and Melbourne are closely related to each other and are relatively segmented from the smaller metropolitan areas. In contrast, there is substantial evidence of commonalities in the cyclical behaviour of the remaining cities, especially those on the Eastern and Southern coasts of Australia.

KW - Common Cycles

KW - Metropolitan Housing Markets

KW - House Price Diffusion

KW - Permanent and Transitory Components

KW - Decomposing Cycles and Trends

U2 - 10.1177/0042098014535643

DO - 10.1177/0042098014535643

M3 - Journal article

VL - 52

SP - 1665

EP - 1682

JO - Urban Studies

JF - Urban Studies

SN - 0042-0980

IS - 9

ER -