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The use of eGFR and ACR to predict decline in renal function in people with diabetes

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The use of eGFR and ACR to predict decline in renal function in people with diabetes. / Hoefield, Richard A.; Kalra, Philip A.; Baker, Patricia G.; Pereira Silva Cunha Sousa, Ines; Diggle, Peter J.; Gibson, Martin J.; O'Donoghue, Donal J.; Middleton, Rachel J.; New, John P.

In: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Vol. 26, No. 3, 03.2011, p. 887-892.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Hoefield, RA, Kalra, PA, Baker, PG, Pereira Silva Cunha Sousa, I, Diggle, PJ, Gibson, MJ, O'Donoghue, DJ, Middleton, RJ & New, JP 2011, 'The use of eGFR and ACR to predict decline in renal function in people with diabetes', Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 887-892. https://doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfq526

APA

Hoefield, R. A., Kalra, P. A., Baker, P. G., Pereira Silva Cunha Sousa, I., Diggle, P. J., Gibson, M. J., O'Donoghue, D. J., Middleton, R. J., & New, J. P. (2011). The use of eGFR and ACR to predict decline in renal function in people with diabetes. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, 26(3), 887-892. https://doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfq526

Vancouver

Hoefield RA, Kalra PA, Baker PG, Pereira Silva Cunha Sousa I, Diggle PJ, Gibson MJ et al. The use of eGFR and ACR to predict decline in renal function in people with diabetes. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation. 2011 Mar;26(3):887-892. https://doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfq526

Author

Hoefield, Richard A. ; Kalra, Philip A. ; Baker, Patricia G. ; Pereira Silva Cunha Sousa, Ines ; Diggle, Peter J. ; Gibson, Martin J. ; O'Donoghue, Donal J. ; Middleton, Rachel J. ; New, John P. / The use of eGFR and ACR to predict decline in renal function in people with diabetes. In: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation. 2011 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 887-892.

Bibtex

@article{c7ab15b8571c438e9d69e8bdc80708ee,
title = "The use of eGFR and ACR to predict decline in renal function in people with diabetes",
abstract = "Background. There have been few attempts to estimate progression of kidney disease in people with diabetes in a single large population with predictive modelling. The aim of this study was to investigate the rate of progression of chronic kidney disease in people with diabetes according to their estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and presence of albuminuria.Methods. Data were collected on all people with diabetes in Salford, UK, where an eGFR could be calculated using the four-variable MDRD formula and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (uACR) was available. All data between 2001 and 2007 were used in the model. Classification of albuminuria status was based on the average of their first two uACR measurements. A longitudinal mixed effect dynamic regression model was fitted to the data. Parameters were estimated by maximum likelihood.Results. For the analysis of the population, average progression of eGFR, uACR and drug prescribing were available in 3431 people. The regression model showed that in people with diabetes and macroalbuminuria, eGFR declined at 5.7% per annum, while the eGFR of those with microalbuminuria or without albuminuria declined at 1.5% and 0.3% per annum, respectively, independently of age (P < 0.0001).Conclusions. The longitudinal effect of time on eGFR showed that people with diabetes and macroalbuminuria have an estimated 19 times more rapid decline in renal function compared with those without albuminuria. This study demonstrates that the progression of kidney disease in diabetic people without albuminuria is relatively benign compared with those with albuminuria.",
keywords = "albuminuria, chronic kidney disease (CKD), diabetes mellitus (DM), epidemiology and outcomes, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), GLOMERULAR-FILTRATION-RATE, CHRONIC KIDNEY-DISEASE, SERUM CREATININE, CARDIOVASCULAR MORTALITY, GENERAL-POPULATION, ALBUMIN EXCRETION, COCKCROFT-GAULT, UNITED-KINGDOM, ALL-CAUSE, NEPHROPATHY",
author = "Hoefield, {Richard A.} and Kalra, {Philip A.} and Baker, {Patricia G.} and {Pereira Silva Cunha Sousa}, Ines and Diggle, {Peter J.} and Gibson, {Martin J.} and O'Donoghue, {Donal J.} and Middleton, {Rachel J.} and New, {John P.}",
year = "2011",
month = mar,
doi = "10.1093/ndt/gfq526",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "887--892",
journal = "Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation",
issn = "0931-0509",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The use of eGFR and ACR to predict decline in renal function in people with diabetes

AU - Hoefield, Richard A.

AU - Kalra, Philip A.

AU - Baker, Patricia G.

AU - Pereira Silva Cunha Sousa, Ines

AU - Diggle, Peter J.

AU - Gibson, Martin J.

AU - O'Donoghue, Donal J.

AU - Middleton, Rachel J.

AU - New, John P.

PY - 2011/3

Y1 - 2011/3

N2 - Background. There have been few attempts to estimate progression of kidney disease in people with diabetes in a single large population with predictive modelling. The aim of this study was to investigate the rate of progression of chronic kidney disease in people with diabetes according to their estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and presence of albuminuria.Methods. Data were collected on all people with diabetes in Salford, UK, where an eGFR could be calculated using the four-variable MDRD formula and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (uACR) was available. All data between 2001 and 2007 were used in the model. Classification of albuminuria status was based on the average of their first two uACR measurements. A longitudinal mixed effect dynamic regression model was fitted to the data. Parameters were estimated by maximum likelihood.Results. For the analysis of the population, average progression of eGFR, uACR and drug prescribing were available in 3431 people. The regression model showed that in people with diabetes and macroalbuminuria, eGFR declined at 5.7% per annum, while the eGFR of those with microalbuminuria or without albuminuria declined at 1.5% and 0.3% per annum, respectively, independently of age (P < 0.0001).Conclusions. The longitudinal effect of time on eGFR showed that people with diabetes and macroalbuminuria have an estimated 19 times more rapid decline in renal function compared with those without albuminuria. This study demonstrates that the progression of kidney disease in diabetic people without albuminuria is relatively benign compared with those with albuminuria.

AB - Background. There have been few attempts to estimate progression of kidney disease in people with diabetes in a single large population with predictive modelling. The aim of this study was to investigate the rate of progression of chronic kidney disease in people with diabetes according to their estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and presence of albuminuria.Methods. Data were collected on all people with diabetes in Salford, UK, where an eGFR could be calculated using the four-variable MDRD formula and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (uACR) was available. All data between 2001 and 2007 were used in the model. Classification of albuminuria status was based on the average of their first two uACR measurements. A longitudinal mixed effect dynamic regression model was fitted to the data. Parameters were estimated by maximum likelihood.Results. For the analysis of the population, average progression of eGFR, uACR and drug prescribing were available in 3431 people. The regression model showed that in people with diabetes and macroalbuminuria, eGFR declined at 5.7% per annum, while the eGFR of those with microalbuminuria or without albuminuria declined at 1.5% and 0.3% per annum, respectively, independently of age (P < 0.0001).Conclusions. The longitudinal effect of time on eGFR showed that people with diabetes and macroalbuminuria have an estimated 19 times more rapid decline in renal function compared with those without albuminuria. This study demonstrates that the progression of kidney disease in diabetic people without albuminuria is relatively benign compared with those with albuminuria.

KW - albuminuria

KW - chronic kidney disease (CKD)

KW - diabetes mellitus (DM)

KW - epidemiology and outcomes

KW - estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)

KW - GLOMERULAR-FILTRATION-RATE

KW - CHRONIC KIDNEY-DISEASE

KW - SERUM CREATININE

KW - CARDIOVASCULAR MORTALITY

KW - GENERAL-POPULATION

KW - ALBUMIN EXCRETION

KW - COCKCROFT-GAULT

KW - UNITED-KINGDOM

KW - ALL-CAUSE

KW - NEPHROPATHY

U2 - 10.1093/ndt/gfq526

DO - 10.1093/ndt/gfq526

M3 - Journal article

VL - 26

SP - 887

EP - 892

JO - Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation

JF - Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation

SN - 0931-0509

IS - 3

ER -