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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Acta Biomaterialia. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Acta Biomaterialia, 139, 2022 DOI: 10.1016/j.actbio.2021.07.065

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    Embargo ends: 31/07/22

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Towards the Translation of Electroconductive Organic Materials for Regeneration of Neural Tissues

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature reviewpeer-review

Published
  • Eleana Manousiouthakis
  • Junggeon Park
  • John Hardy
  • Jae Lee
  • Christine Schmidt
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>28/02/2022
<mark>Journal</mark>Acta Biomaterialia
Volume139
Number of pages21
Pages (from-to)22-42
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date31/07/21
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Carbon-based conductive and electroactive materials (e.g., derivatives of graphene, fullerenes, polypyrrole, polythiophene, polyaniline) have been studied since the 1970s for use in a broad range of applications. These materials have electrical properties comparable to those of commonly used metals, while providing other benefits such as flexibility in processing and modification with biologics (e.g., cells, biomolecules), to yield electroactive materials with biomimetic mechanical and chemical properties. In this review, we focus on the uses of these electroconductive materials in the context of the central and peripheral nervous system, specifically recent studies in the peripheral nerve, spinal cord, brain, eye, and ear. We also highlight in vivo studies and clinical trials, as well as a snapshot of emerging classes of electroconductive materials (e.g., biodegradable materials). We believe such specialized electrically conductive biomaterials will clinically impact the field of tissue regeneration in the foreseeable future.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Acta Biomaterialia. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Acta Biomaterialia, 139, 2022 DOI: 10.1016/j.actbio.2021.07.065