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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Long Range Planning. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Long Range Planning, 54, 4, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.lrp.2021.102108

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Unsanctioned Practice Innovation: A Process Model

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
Article number102108
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>31/08/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>Long Range Planning
Issue number4
Volume54
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date24/04/21
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

This paper focuses on unsanctioned practice innovations (UPIs) and how they are generated and realised by those outside the senior ranks of an organisation. Through a longitudinal in-depth qualitative study of a multinational firm between 2001-2014, we discovered how deviance from formal procedural frameworks had diverse and often creative and productive effects that countered the constraints of transparency, legitimacy and top-down planning of practice innovations. Deviants enact a range of manoeuvres, often resulting in delegitimising prescribed practices and novel solutions to problems that an organisation encounters. We provide an analytical account of these UPIs, the manoeuvres necessary in their claims to legitimacy and the implications for more formal practice innovations.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Long Range Planning. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Long Range Planning, 54, 4, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.lrp.2021.102108