Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Viral forensic genomics reveals the relatedness...

Electronic data

  • Bowen_et_al_preprint

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Virology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Virology, 492, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.virol.2016.02.013

    Accepted author manuscript, 1.47 MB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Viral forensic genomics reveals the relatedness of classic herpes simplex virus strains KOS, KOS63, and KOS79

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
  • Christopher D. Bowen
  • Daniel W. Renner
  • Jacob T. Shreve
  • Yolanda Tafuri
  • Kimberly M. Payne
  • Richard D. Dix
  • Paul R. Kinchington
  • Derek Gatherer
  • Moriah L. Szpara
Close
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>05/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Virology
Volume492
Number of pages8
Pages (from-to)179-186
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date4/03/16
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a widespread global pathogen, of which the strain KOS is one of the most extensively studied. Previous sequence studies revealed that KOS does not cluster with other strains of North American geographic origin, but instead clustered with Asian strains. We sequenced a historical isolate of the original KOS strain, called KOS63, along with a separately isolated strain attributed to the same source individual, termed KOS79. Genomic analyses revealed that KOS63 closely resembled other recently sequenced isolates of KOS and was of Asian origin, but that KOS79 was a genetically unrelated strain that clustered in genetic distance analyses with HSV-1 strains of North American/European origin. These data suggest that the human source of KOS63 and KOS79 could have been infected with two genetically unrelated strains of disparate geographic origins. A PCR RFLP test was developed for rapid identification of these strains.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Virology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Virology, 492, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.virol.2016.02.013