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  • IMPL hearing and seeing only preprint

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Infant Behavior and Development. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Infant Behavior and Development, 60, 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.infbeh.2020.101449

    Accepted author manuscript, 257 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 18/02/22

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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What am I supposed to be looking at?: Controls and measures in inter-modal preferential looking

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Article number101449
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>31/08/2020
<mark>Journal</mark>Infant Behavior and Development
Volume60
Number of pages11
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date18/08/20
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Intermodal preferential looking (IMPL) is widely used in experimental studies of infant development, especially language development. Control measures vary, and it is not clear how these affect findings. We examined effects of parental awareness of stimuli. Infants (17-19mo) looked at paired pictures, one name-known and one name-unknown, each assigned target status in 50% of trials. Infants looked longer at a name-known than a name-unknown target, regardless of parents’ awareness. When parents were aware, looking to a name-unknown target increased over a paired name-known non-target. There is evidence that infants’ looking at pictures in this paradigm is not due to direct matching of targets to novel names, but is influenced by additional cues present, in a way that could alter the conclusions of studies of infant word learning and other aspects of infant learning. Implications of these findings are discussed, emphasising replicability and theoretical conclusions drawn from studies using this method.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Infant Behavior and Development. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Infant Behavior and Development, 60, 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.infbeh.2020.101449