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Why couldn’t I stop her?: self injury: the views of staff and clients in a medium secure unit

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Why couldn’t I stop her? self injury: the views of staff and clients in a medium secure unit. / Duperouzel, Helen; Fish, Rebecca.

In: British Journal of Learning Disabilities, Vol. 36, No. 1, 03.2008, p. 59-65.

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Duperouzel, Helen ; Fish, Rebecca. / Why couldn’t I stop her? self injury: the views of staff and clients in a medium secure unit. In: British Journal of Learning Disabilities. 2008 ; Vol. 36, No. 1. pp. 59-65.

Bibtex

@article{ab0d3c790d404c10aacc5354c85c5013,
title = "Why couldn{\textquoteright}t I stop her?: self injury: the views of staff and clients in a medium secure unit",
abstract = "Accessible summary•Clients and staff at a service called Calderstones talked to the authors about self injury.•Clients said that staff do not understand why they self-injure. Some clients feel punished when staff stop them self-injuring. All clients like talking to staff and said that telling their problems to staff helps them. Clients said that they should be allowed self-injure without staff being blamed.•Staff said they feel upset and worried when a client self-injures. They told the authors they would like more training about self-injury. Some staff would like clients to be allowed to self-injure, but don't want to be blamed for a client's injuries.SummaryThis paper is the synthesis of two pre-existing studies. It details the experiences of nine people with mild/moderate learning disabilities who self injure, and those who work with them. At the time of this study the participants were living and working in a medium secure unit at Calderstones NHS Trust in Lancashire. A phenomenological approach was used, and during in-depth interviews, the participants gave rich descriptions of their experiences of self injury. The descriptions that emerged from the interviews detailed four main themes: understanding, communication, control and blame.",
keywords = "Client perspectives, self injury, staff perspectives",
author = "Helen Duperouzel and Rebecca Fish",
year = "2008",
month = mar,
doi = "10.1111/j.1468-3156.2007.00486.x",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "59--65",
journal = "British Journal of Learning Disabilities",
issn = "1354-4187",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Why couldn’t I stop her?

T2 - self injury: the views of staff and clients in a medium secure unit

AU - Duperouzel, Helen

AU - Fish, Rebecca

PY - 2008/3

Y1 - 2008/3

N2 - Accessible summary•Clients and staff at a service called Calderstones talked to the authors about self injury.•Clients said that staff do not understand why they self-injure. Some clients feel punished when staff stop them self-injuring. All clients like talking to staff and said that telling their problems to staff helps them. Clients said that they should be allowed self-injure without staff being blamed.•Staff said they feel upset and worried when a client self-injures. They told the authors they would like more training about self-injury. Some staff would like clients to be allowed to self-injure, but don't want to be blamed for a client's injuries.SummaryThis paper is the synthesis of two pre-existing studies. It details the experiences of nine people with mild/moderate learning disabilities who self injure, and those who work with them. At the time of this study the participants were living and working in a medium secure unit at Calderstones NHS Trust in Lancashire. A phenomenological approach was used, and during in-depth interviews, the participants gave rich descriptions of their experiences of self injury. The descriptions that emerged from the interviews detailed four main themes: understanding, communication, control and blame.

AB - Accessible summary•Clients and staff at a service called Calderstones talked to the authors about self injury.•Clients said that staff do not understand why they self-injure. Some clients feel punished when staff stop them self-injuring. All clients like talking to staff and said that telling their problems to staff helps them. Clients said that they should be allowed self-injure without staff being blamed.•Staff said they feel upset and worried when a client self-injures. They told the authors they would like more training about self-injury. Some staff would like clients to be allowed to self-injure, but don't want to be blamed for a client's injuries.SummaryThis paper is the synthesis of two pre-existing studies. It details the experiences of nine people with mild/moderate learning disabilities who self injure, and those who work with them. At the time of this study the participants were living and working in a medium secure unit at Calderstones NHS Trust in Lancashire. A phenomenological approach was used, and during in-depth interviews, the participants gave rich descriptions of their experiences of self injury. The descriptions that emerged from the interviews detailed four main themes: understanding, communication, control and blame.

KW - Client perspectives

KW - self injury

KW - staff perspectives

U2 - 10.1111/j.1468-3156.2007.00486.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1468-3156.2007.00486.x

M3 - Journal article

VL - 36

SP - 59

EP - 65

JO - British Journal of Learning Disabilities

JF - British Journal of Learning Disabilities

SN - 1354-4187

IS - 1

ER -