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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Production Research on 06 Mar 2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00207543.2020.1735667

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Workload Control Order Release in General and Pure Flow Shops with Limited Buffer Size Induced Blocking: An Assessment by Simulation

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Workload Control Order Release in General and Pure Flow Shops with Limited Buffer Size Induced Blocking : An Assessment by Simulation. / Thurer, Matthias; Ma, Lin; Stevenson, Mark.

In: International Journal of Production Research, Vol. 59, No. 8, 01.05.2021, p. 2558-2569.

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@article{4dc974586c834bb8a919f0c0e4feb99e,
title = "Workload Control Order Release in General and Pure Flow Shops with Limited Buffer Size Induced Blocking: An Assessment by Simulation",
abstract = "Most manufacturing shops in practice have limited physical space in front of each workstation, due, for example, to physical, economical or operational constraints. As a result, a job may cause blocking because it has to remain at a given station after an operation has been completed until space in front of the next station in its routing becomes available. Despite this practical reality, the Workload Control literature typically assumes infinite buffer limits and therefore neglects the impact of blocking. Using simulation, we highlight the direct, detrimental impact of blocking in both the pure and general flow shop. Workload Control order release dampens the effect of blocking and improves overall performance. This makes Workload Control order release even more important in the context of shops with blocking or physical space constraints. Further analysis reveals that the impact of blocking is less pronounced in the pure flow shop given its directed routing. Finally, most of the blocking that occurs is because jobs cannot enter the shop, i.e. there is no space in front of the gateway station. This re-emphasises the close relationship between blocking and release methods that limit the workload, and it highlights the importance of workload balancing.",
author = "Matthias Thurer and Lin Ma and Mark Stevenson",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Production Research on 06 Mar 2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00207543.2020.1735667",
year = "2021",
month = may,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/00207543.2020.1735667",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "2558--2569",
journal = "International Journal of Production Research",
issn = "0020-7543",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Workload Control Order Release in General and Pure Flow Shops with Limited Buffer Size Induced Blocking

T2 - An Assessment by Simulation

AU - Thurer, Matthias

AU - Ma, Lin

AU - Stevenson, Mark

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Production Research on 06 Mar 2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00207543.2020.1735667

PY - 2021/5/1

Y1 - 2021/5/1

N2 - Most manufacturing shops in practice have limited physical space in front of each workstation, due, for example, to physical, economical or operational constraints. As a result, a job may cause blocking because it has to remain at a given station after an operation has been completed until space in front of the next station in its routing becomes available. Despite this practical reality, the Workload Control literature typically assumes infinite buffer limits and therefore neglects the impact of blocking. Using simulation, we highlight the direct, detrimental impact of blocking in both the pure and general flow shop. Workload Control order release dampens the effect of blocking and improves overall performance. This makes Workload Control order release even more important in the context of shops with blocking or physical space constraints. Further analysis reveals that the impact of blocking is less pronounced in the pure flow shop given its directed routing. Finally, most of the blocking that occurs is because jobs cannot enter the shop, i.e. there is no space in front of the gateway station. This re-emphasises the close relationship between blocking and release methods that limit the workload, and it highlights the importance of workload balancing.

AB - Most manufacturing shops in practice have limited physical space in front of each workstation, due, for example, to physical, economical or operational constraints. As a result, a job may cause blocking because it has to remain at a given station after an operation has been completed until space in front of the next station in its routing becomes available. Despite this practical reality, the Workload Control literature typically assumes infinite buffer limits and therefore neglects the impact of blocking. Using simulation, we highlight the direct, detrimental impact of blocking in both the pure and general flow shop. Workload Control order release dampens the effect of blocking and improves overall performance. This makes Workload Control order release even more important in the context of shops with blocking or physical space constraints. Further analysis reveals that the impact of blocking is less pronounced in the pure flow shop given its directed routing. Finally, most of the blocking that occurs is because jobs cannot enter the shop, i.e. there is no space in front of the gateway station. This re-emphasises the close relationship between blocking and release methods that limit the workload, and it highlights the importance of workload balancing.

U2 - 10.1080/00207543.2020.1735667

DO - 10.1080/00207543.2020.1735667

M3 - Journal article

VL - 59

SP - 2558

EP - 2569

JO - International Journal of Production Research

JF - International Journal of Production Research

SN - 0020-7543

IS - 8

ER -