12,000

We have over 12,000 students, from over 100 countries, within one of the safest campuses in the UK

93%

93% of Lancaster students go into work or further study within six months of graduating

Home > Research > Researchers > Manus Hayne
View graph of relations

Current Postgraduate Research Students

Manus Hayne supervises 6 postgraduate research students. Some of the students have produced research profiles, these are listed below:

Student research profiles

Show all »

« Back

Dr Manus Hayne

Reader

Manus Hayne

Physics Building

Lancaster University

Bailrigg

Lancaster LA1 4YB

United Kingdom

Tel: +44 1524 593279

Location: A36

Research overview

My research interests are in the physics and applications of low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures (quantum wells, wires and dots). I collaborate with many UK and European universities, research institutes and companies.

PhD supervision

A range of cutting-edge research projects are available for studies leading to the award of a PhD. Please contact me for further details

Profile

I studied at the University of Southampton and did a PhD and a postdoc at the University of Exeter, before moving to the European mainland. There I briefly worked in Paris, and then at the KU Leuven, Belgium for nearly 10 years, where I investigated semiconductor nanostructures in very high magnetic fields (up to 50 T). I returned to the UK to join the Physics Department in Lancaster in June 2006.

Research Interests

My research interests are in the physics and applications of low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures (quantum wells, wires and dots), especially their study in high magnetic fields. I collaborate with many UK and European universities, research institutes and companies.

Current research includes the study of quantum dots in different materials systems, with a particualar emphasis on 'type-II' GaSb quantum dots and quantum rings embedded in GaAs. These structures confine positive charge (holes) in a very deep potential, but do not confine electrons. This makes them very different from conventional 'type-I' quantum dots that confine both electrons and holes. Besides their unusual physical properties, GaSb quantum dots also have potential for applications in a wide range of areas including memories, solar cells, quantum information processing and lasers.

Other areas of active investigation currently include the confinement properties of 'conventional' InAs/GaAs quantum dots, strain-free GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots and InGaAsNSb quantum wells for telecoms applications.

View all (73) »