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Are children with autism more likely to retain object names when learning from colour photographs or black-and-white cartoons?

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Are children with autism more likely to retain object names when learning from colour photographs or black-and-white cartoons? / Carter, Cheriece; Hartley, Calum.

In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 51, No. 9, 30.09.2021, p. 3050-3062.

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@article{f132925d92454d78b89643cf01c3cec6,
title = "Are children with autism more likely to retain object names when learning from colour photographs or black-and-white cartoons?",
abstract = "For the first time, this study investigated whether children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing (TD) children matched on language comprehension (M age equivalent =  ~ 44 months) are more likely to retain words when learning from colour photographs than black-and-white cartoons. Participants used mutual exclusivity to fast map novel word-picture relationships and retention was assessed following a 5-min delay. Children with ASD achieved significantly greater retention accuracy when learning from photographs rather than cartoons and, surprisingly, responded more accurately than TD children when learning from photographs. Our results demonstrate that children with ASD benefit from greater iconicity when learning words from pictures, providing a data-grounded rationale for using colour photographs when administering picture-based interventions.",
keywords = "Autism spectrum disorder, Word learning, Iconicity, Fast mapping, Retention, Pictures",
author = "Cheriece Carter and Calum Hartley",
note = "The final publication is available at Springer via https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10803-020-04771-2",
year = "2021",
month = sep,
day = "30",
doi = "10.1007/s10803-020-04771-2",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "3050--3062",
journal = "Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders",
issn = "0162-3257",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "9",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are children with autism more likely to retain object names when learning from colour photographs or black-and-white cartoons?

AU - Carter, Cheriece

AU - Hartley, Calum

N1 - The final publication is available at Springer via https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10803-020-04771-2

PY - 2021/9/30

Y1 - 2021/9/30

N2 - For the first time, this study investigated whether children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing (TD) children matched on language comprehension (M age equivalent =  ~ 44 months) are more likely to retain words when learning from colour photographs than black-and-white cartoons. Participants used mutual exclusivity to fast map novel word-picture relationships and retention was assessed following a 5-min delay. Children with ASD achieved significantly greater retention accuracy when learning from photographs rather than cartoons and, surprisingly, responded more accurately than TD children when learning from photographs. Our results demonstrate that children with ASD benefit from greater iconicity when learning words from pictures, providing a data-grounded rationale for using colour photographs when administering picture-based interventions.

AB - For the first time, this study investigated whether children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing (TD) children matched on language comprehension (M age equivalent =  ~ 44 months) are more likely to retain words when learning from colour photographs than black-and-white cartoons. Participants used mutual exclusivity to fast map novel word-picture relationships and retention was assessed following a 5-min delay. Children with ASD achieved significantly greater retention accuracy when learning from photographs rather than cartoons and, surprisingly, responded more accurately than TD children when learning from photographs. Our results demonstrate that children with ASD benefit from greater iconicity when learning words from pictures, providing a data-grounded rationale for using colour photographs when administering picture-based interventions.

KW - Autism spectrum disorder

KW - Word learning

KW - Iconicity

KW - Fast mapping

KW - Retention

KW - Pictures

U2 - 10.1007/s10803-020-04771-2

DO - 10.1007/s10803-020-04771-2

M3 - Journal article

VL - 51

SP - 3050

EP - 3062

JO - Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

JF - Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

SN - 0162-3257

IS - 9

ER -