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    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Cotterill A, Jaki T. Dose‐escalation strategies which use subgroup information. Pharmaceutical Statistics. 2018;17:414–436. https://doi.org/10.1002/pst.1860 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pst.18606/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

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Dose-escalation strategies which utilise subgroup information

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Dose-escalation strategies which utilise subgroup information. / Cotterill, Amy; Jaki, Thomas Friedrich.

In: Pharmaceutical Statistics, Vol. 17, No. 5, 09.2018, p. 414-436.

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Cotterill, Amy ; Jaki, Thomas Friedrich. / Dose-escalation strategies which utilise subgroup information. In: Pharmaceutical Statistics. 2018 ; Vol. 17, No. 5. pp. 414-436.

Bibtex

@article{e960d84e30994447937ac516fa240b5a,
title = "Dose-escalation strategies which utilise subgroup information",
abstract = "Dose‐escalation trials commonly assume a homogeneous trial population to identify a single recommended dose of the experimental treatment for use in future trials. Wrongly assuming a homogeneous population can lead to a diluted treatment effect. Equally, exclusion of a subgroup that could in fact benefit from the treatment can cause a beneficial treatment effect to be missed. Accounting for a potential subgroup effect (ie, difference in reaction to the treatment between subgroups) in dose‐escalation can increase the chance of finding the treatment to be efficacious in a larger patient population.A standard Bayesian model‐based method of dose‐escalation is extended to account for a subgroup effect by including covariates for subgroup membership in the dose‐toxicity model. A stratified design performs well but uses available data inefficiently and makes no inferences concerning presence of a subgroup effect. A hypothesis test could potentially rectify this problem but the small sample sizes result in a low‐powered test. As an alternative, the use of spike and slab priors for variable selection is proposed. This method continually assesses the presence of a subgroup effect, enabling efficient use of the available trial data throughout escalation and in identifying the recommended dose(s). A simulation study, based on real trial data, was conducted and this design was found to be both promising and feasible.",
author = "Amy Cotterill and Jaki, {Thomas Friedrich}",
note = "This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Cotterill A, Jaki T. Dose‐escalation strategies which use subgroup information. Pharmaceutical Statistics. 2018;17:414–436. https://doi.org/10.1002/pst.1860 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pst.18606/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.",
year = "2018",
month = sep,
doi = "10.1002/pst.1860",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "414--436",
journal = "Pharmaceutical Statistics",
issn = "1539-1604",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dose-escalation strategies which utilise subgroup information

AU - Cotterill, Amy

AU - Jaki, Thomas Friedrich

N1 - This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Cotterill A, Jaki T. Dose‐escalation strategies which use subgroup information. Pharmaceutical Statistics. 2018;17:414–436. https://doi.org/10.1002/pst.1860 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pst.18606/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

PY - 2018/9

Y1 - 2018/9

N2 - Dose‐escalation trials commonly assume a homogeneous trial population to identify a single recommended dose of the experimental treatment for use in future trials. Wrongly assuming a homogeneous population can lead to a diluted treatment effect. Equally, exclusion of a subgroup that could in fact benefit from the treatment can cause a beneficial treatment effect to be missed. Accounting for a potential subgroup effect (ie, difference in reaction to the treatment between subgroups) in dose‐escalation can increase the chance of finding the treatment to be efficacious in a larger patient population.A standard Bayesian model‐based method of dose‐escalation is extended to account for a subgroup effect by including covariates for subgroup membership in the dose‐toxicity model. A stratified design performs well but uses available data inefficiently and makes no inferences concerning presence of a subgroup effect. A hypothesis test could potentially rectify this problem but the small sample sizes result in a low‐powered test. As an alternative, the use of spike and slab priors for variable selection is proposed. This method continually assesses the presence of a subgroup effect, enabling efficient use of the available trial data throughout escalation and in identifying the recommended dose(s). A simulation study, based on real trial data, was conducted and this design was found to be both promising and feasible.

AB - Dose‐escalation trials commonly assume a homogeneous trial population to identify a single recommended dose of the experimental treatment for use in future trials. Wrongly assuming a homogeneous population can lead to a diluted treatment effect. Equally, exclusion of a subgroup that could in fact benefit from the treatment can cause a beneficial treatment effect to be missed. Accounting for a potential subgroup effect (ie, difference in reaction to the treatment between subgroups) in dose‐escalation can increase the chance of finding the treatment to be efficacious in a larger patient population.A standard Bayesian model‐based method of dose‐escalation is extended to account for a subgroup effect by including covariates for subgroup membership in the dose‐toxicity model. A stratified design performs well but uses available data inefficiently and makes no inferences concerning presence of a subgroup effect. A hypothesis test could potentially rectify this problem but the small sample sizes result in a low‐powered test. As an alternative, the use of spike and slab priors for variable selection is proposed. This method continually assesses the presence of a subgroup effect, enabling efficient use of the available trial data throughout escalation and in identifying the recommended dose(s). A simulation study, based on real trial data, was conducted and this design was found to be both promising and feasible.

U2 - 10.1002/pst.1860

DO - 10.1002/pst.1860

M3 - Journal article

VL - 17

SP - 414

EP - 436

JO - Pharmaceutical Statistics

JF - Pharmaceutical Statistics

SN - 1539-1604

IS - 5

ER -