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    Rights statement: This article has been accepted for publication in Journal of Medical Ethics 2021 following peer review, and the Version of Record can be accessed online at [insert full DOI eg. https://doi.org/10.1136/medethics-2020-106477

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Examining the ethical underpinnings of Universal Basic Income as a public health policy: prophylaxis, social engineering and ‘good’ lives

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

E-pub ahead of print
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>18/01/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Medical Ethics
Publication StatusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date18/01/21
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

At a time of COVID-19 Pandemic, Universal Basic Income (UBI) has been presented as a potential public health ‘upstream intervention’. Research indicates a possible impact on health by reducing poverty, fostering health-promoting behaviour and ameliorating biopsychosocial pathways to health. This novel case for UBI as a public health measure is starting to receive attention from a range of political positions and organizations. However, discussion of the ethical underpinnings of UBI as a public health policy is sparse. This is depriving policymakers of clear perspectives about the reasons for, restrictions to and potential for the policy’s design and implementation. In this article, we note prospective pathways to impact on health in order to assess fit with Rawlsian, capabilities and perfectionist approaches to public health policy. We suggest that Raz’ pluralist perfectionist approach may fit most comfortably with the prospective pathways to impact, which has implications for allocation of resources.

Bibliographic note

This article has been accepted for publication in Journal of Medical Ethics 2021 following peer review, and the Version of Record can be accessed online at [insert full DOI eg. https://doi.org/10.1136/medethics-2020-106477