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Nanoscale Real-Time Detection of Quantum Vortices at Millikelvin Temperatures

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Nanoscale Real-Time Detection of Quantum Vortices at Millikelvin Temperatures. / Guthrie, A.; Kafanov, S.; Noble, M. T. et al.

In: arxiv.org, 09.07.2020.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal article

Harvard

Guthrie, A, Kafanov, S, Noble, MT, Pashkin, YA, Pickett, GR, Tsepelin, V, Dorofeev, AA, Krupenin, VA & Presnov, DE 2020, 'Nanoscale Real-Time Detection of Quantum Vortices at Millikelvin Temperatures', arxiv.org.

APA

Guthrie, A., Kafanov, S., Noble, M. T., Pashkin, Y. A., Pickett, G. R., Tsepelin, V., Dorofeev, A. A., Krupenin, V. A., & Presnov, D. E. (2020). Nanoscale Real-Time Detection of Quantum Vortices at Millikelvin Temperatures. arxiv.org.

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@article{f9cf598464c74437ba93617c0e2f75f9,
title = "Nanoscale Real-Time Detection of Quantum Vortices at Millikelvin Temperatures",
abstract = "Since we still lack a theory of classical turbulence, attention has focused on the conceptually simpler turbulence in quantum fluids. Can such systems of identical singly-quantized vortices provide a physically accessible {"}toy model{"} of the classical counterpart? That said, we have hitherto lacked detectors capable of the real-time, non-invasive probing of the wide range of length scales involved in quantum turbulence. However, we demonstrate here the real-time detection of quantum vortices by a nanoscale resonant beam in superfluid $^4$He at 10 mK. The basic idea is that we can trap a single vortex along the length of a nanobeam and observe the transitions as a vortex is either trapped or released, which we observe through the shift in the resonant frequency of the beam. With a tuning fork source, we can control the ambient vorticity density and follow its influence on the vortex capture and release rates. But, most important, we show that these devices are capable of probing turbulence on the micron scale. ",
keywords = "cond-mat.mes-hall, cond-mat.quant-gas, physics.flu-dyn, physics.ins-det",
author = "A. Guthrie and S. Kafanov and Noble, {M. T.} and Pashkin, {Yu A.} and Pickett, {G. R.} and V. Tsepelin and Dorofeev, {A. A.} and Krupenin, {V. A.} and Presnov, {D. E.}",
year = "2020",
month = jul,
day = "9",
language = "English",
journal = "arxiv.org",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nanoscale Real-Time Detection of Quantum Vortices at Millikelvin Temperatures

AU - Guthrie, A.

AU - Kafanov, S.

AU - Noble, M. T.

AU - Pashkin, Yu A.

AU - Pickett, G. R.

AU - Tsepelin, V.

AU - Dorofeev, A. A.

AU - Krupenin, V. A.

AU - Presnov, D. E.

PY - 2020/7/9

Y1 - 2020/7/9

N2 - Since we still lack a theory of classical turbulence, attention has focused on the conceptually simpler turbulence in quantum fluids. Can such systems of identical singly-quantized vortices provide a physically accessible "toy model" of the classical counterpart? That said, we have hitherto lacked detectors capable of the real-time, non-invasive probing of the wide range of length scales involved in quantum turbulence. However, we demonstrate here the real-time detection of quantum vortices by a nanoscale resonant beam in superfluid $^4$He at 10 mK. The basic idea is that we can trap a single vortex along the length of a nanobeam and observe the transitions as a vortex is either trapped or released, which we observe through the shift in the resonant frequency of the beam. With a tuning fork source, we can control the ambient vorticity density and follow its influence on the vortex capture and release rates. But, most important, we show that these devices are capable of probing turbulence on the micron scale.

AB - Since we still lack a theory of classical turbulence, attention has focused on the conceptually simpler turbulence in quantum fluids. Can such systems of identical singly-quantized vortices provide a physically accessible "toy model" of the classical counterpart? That said, we have hitherto lacked detectors capable of the real-time, non-invasive probing of the wide range of length scales involved in quantum turbulence. However, we demonstrate here the real-time detection of quantum vortices by a nanoscale resonant beam in superfluid $^4$He at 10 mK. The basic idea is that we can trap a single vortex along the length of a nanobeam and observe the transitions as a vortex is either trapped or released, which we observe through the shift in the resonant frequency of the beam. With a tuning fork source, we can control the ambient vorticity density and follow its influence on the vortex capture and release rates. But, most important, we show that these devices are capable of probing turbulence on the micron scale.

KW - cond-mat.mes-hall

KW - cond-mat.quant-gas

KW - physics.flu-dyn

KW - physics.ins-det

M3 - Journal article

JO - arxiv.org

JF - arxiv.org

ER -