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  • 2020_DE_Student learning during COVID-19_It was not as bad as we feared_Lee et al_Open Version

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Distance Education on 10/02/2021, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01587919.2020.1869529

    Accepted author manuscript, 571 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 10/08/22

    Available under license: CC BY: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

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Student learning during COVID-19: It was not as bad as we feared

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Student learning during COVID-19 : It was not as bad as we feared. / Lee, Kyungmee; Fanguy II, Mik; Lu, Sophie; Bligh, Brett.

In: Distance Education, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.03.2021, p. 164-172.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

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Lee, Kyungmee ; Fanguy II, Mik ; Lu, Sophie ; Bligh, Brett. / Student learning during COVID-19 : It was not as bad as we feared. In: Distance Education. 2021 ; Vol. 42, No. 1. pp. 164-172.

Bibtex

@article{b10dd552a3564830ad53af2eddfb162b,
title = "Student learning during COVID-19: It was not as bad as we feared",
abstract = "While much is discussed of the challenges that educators and their institutions have been facing during COVID-19, there is little reported about how students have been coping with the challenges. In this short piece, we present preliminary data on university students{\textquoteright} perceptions of online learning and teaching during the pandemic. Our findings from a student course satisfaction survey, conducted in two universities during the 2020 summer term (June through August), reveal that students have been more resilient than is often assumed. In light of these findings as well as the reflections of authors in a previous issue of Distance Education, we will discuss some important implications for distance education scholarship.",
keywords = "COVID-19, distance learning, student satisfaction, student resilience, East Asia",
author = "Kyungmee Lee and {Fanguy II}, Mik and Sophie Lu and Brett Bligh",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Distance Education on 10/02/2021, available online:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01587919.2020.1869529",
year = "2021",
month = mar,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/01587919.2020.1869529",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "164--172",
journal = "Distance Education",
issn = "0158-7919",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Student learning during COVID-19

T2 - It was not as bad as we feared

AU - Lee, Kyungmee

AU - Fanguy II, Mik

AU - Lu, Sophie

AU - Bligh, Brett

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Distance Education on 10/02/2021, available online:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01587919.2020.1869529

PY - 2021/3/1

Y1 - 2021/3/1

N2 - While much is discussed of the challenges that educators and their institutions have been facing during COVID-19, there is little reported about how students have been coping with the challenges. In this short piece, we present preliminary data on university students’ perceptions of online learning and teaching during the pandemic. Our findings from a student course satisfaction survey, conducted in two universities during the 2020 summer term (June through August), reveal that students have been more resilient than is often assumed. In light of these findings as well as the reflections of authors in a previous issue of Distance Education, we will discuss some important implications for distance education scholarship.

AB - While much is discussed of the challenges that educators and their institutions have been facing during COVID-19, there is little reported about how students have been coping with the challenges. In this short piece, we present preliminary data on university students’ perceptions of online learning and teaching during the pandemic. Our findings from a student course satisfaction survey, conducted in two universities during the 2020 summer term (June through August), reveal that students have been more resilient than is often assumed. In light of these findings as well as the reflections of authors in a previous issue of Distance Education, we will discuss some important implications for distance education scholarship.

KW - COVID-19

KW - distance learning

KW - student satisfaction

KW - student resilience

KW - East Asia

U2 - 10.1080/01587919.2020.1869529

DO - 10.1080/01587919.2020.1869529

M3 - Journal article

VL - 42

SP - 164

EP - 172

JO - Distance Education

JF - Distance Education

SN - 0158-7919

IS - 1

ER -