Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Celebrity brand break-up

Electronic data

  • Accepted JBR Celebrity Brand Break-up 22-3-2022[82]

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journl of Business Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Business Research, 145, 2022 DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2022.03.039

    Accepted author manuscript, 628 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 23/09/23

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Celebrity brand break-up: Fan experiences of para-loveshock

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>30/06/2022
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Business Research
Volume145
Number of pages12
Pages (from-to)720-731
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date23/03/22
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

When consumers become fans of celebrities, they can form intense emotional attachments that resemble a kind of love. Although the love felt for celebrities is based on one-sided parasocial relationships, fans nevertheless experience a trauma that they consider to be very real when these illusory relationships end. We explore how fans manage and perform their break-up with a beloved celebrity brand following public allegations of wrongdoing. Building on Giddens’ theorization of loveshock – which encapsulates the disorienting after-effects of falling out of love – we propose the new concept of para-loveshock. Para-loveshock is performed socially and discursively through three fan practices: grief enfranchisement; flagellation; and indignation. Recognizing how fans perform and legitimize their trauma through these practices helps to sensitize managers to the importance of consumer identity work following celebrity transgressions. This has implications for how damage control efforts are planned and how managers engage with fans when responding to celebrity transgression.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journl of Business Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Business Research, 145, 2022 DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2022.03.039