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Keeping agricultural soil out of rivers: evidence of sediment and nutrient accumulation within field wetlands in the UK

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Keeping agricultural soil out of rivers : evidence of sediment and nutrient accumulation within field wetlands in the UK. / Ockenden, Mary; Deasy, Clare; Quinton, John et al.

In: Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 135, 15.03.2014, p. 54-62.

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Ockenden M, Deasy C, Quinton J, Surridge B, Stoate C. Keeping agricultural soil out of rivers: evidence of sediment and nutrient accumulation within field wetlands in the UK. Journal of Environmental Management. 2014 Mar 15;135:54-62. doi: 10.1016/j.jenvman.2014.01.015

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@article{d3d367ec6fc4498898d4fc12d1e04856,
title = "Keeping agricultural soil out of rivers: evidence of sediment and nutrient accumulation within field wetlands in the UK",
abstract = "Intensification of agriculture has resulted in increased soil degradation and erosion, with associated pollution of surface waters. Small field wetlands, constructed along runoff pathways, offer one option for slowing down and storing runoff in order to allow more time for sedimentation and for nutrients to be taken up by plants or micro-organisms. This paper describes research to provide quantitative evidence for the effectiveness of small field wetlands in the UK landscape. Ten wetlands were built on four farms in Cumbria and Leicestershire, UK. Annual surveys of sediment and nutrient accumulation in 2010, 2011 and 2012 indicated that most sediment was trapped at a sandy site (70 tonnes over 3 years), compared to a silty site (40 tonnes over 3 years) and a clay site (2 tonnes over 3 years). The timing of rainfall was more important than total annual rainfall for sediment accumulation, with most sediment transported in a few intense rainfall events, especially when these coincided with bare soil or poor crop cover. Nutrient concentration within sediments was inversely related to median particle size, but the total mass of nutrients trapped was dependent on the total mass of sediment trapped. Ratios of nutrient elements in the wetland sediments were consistent between sites, despite different catchment characteristics across the individual wetlands. The nutrient value of sediment collected from the wetlands was similar to that of soil in the surrounding fields; dredged sediment was considered to have value as soil replacement but not as fertiliser. Overall, small field wetlands can make a valuable contribution to keeping soil out of rivers.",
keywords = "Constructed wetlands, Soil degradation, Soil erosion, Phosphorus, Diffuse pollution , Catchment management",
author = "Mary Ockenden and Clare Deasy and John Quinton and Ben Surridge and Chris Stoate",
year = "2014",
month = mar,
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.jenvman.2014.01.015",
language = "English",
volume = "135",
pages = "54--62",
journal = "Journal of Environmental Management",
issn = "0301-4797",
publisher = "Academic Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Keeping agricultural soil out of rivers

T2 - evidence of sediment and nutrient accumulation within field wetlands in the UK

AU - Ockenden, Mary

AU - Deasy, Clare

AU - Quinton, John

AU - Surridge, Ben

AU - Stoate, Chris

PY - 2014/3/15

Y1 - 2014/3/15

N2 - Intensification of agriculture has resulted in increased soil degradation and erosion, with associated pollution of surface waters. Small field wetlands, constructed along runoff pathways, offer one option for slowing down and storing runoff in order to allow more time for sedimentation and for nutrients to be taken up by plants or micro-organisms. This paper describes research to provide quantitative evidence for the effectiveness of small field wetlands in the UK landscape. Ten wetlands were built on four farms in Cumbria and Leicestershire, UK. Annual surveys of sediment and nutrient accumulation in 2010, 2011 and 2012 indicated that most sediment was trapped at a sandy site (70 tonnes over 3 years), compared to a silty site (40 tonnes over 3 years) and a clay site (2 tonnes over 3 years). The timing of rainfall was more important than total annual rainfall for sediment accumulation, with most sediment transported in a few intense rainfall events, especially when these coincided with bare soil or poor crop cover. Nutrient concentration within sediments was inversely related to median particle size, but the total mass of nutrients trapped was dependent on the total mass of sediment trapped. Ratios of nutrient elements in the wetland sediments were consistent between sites, despite different catchment characteristics across the individual wetlands. The nutrient value of sediment collected from the wetlands was similar to that of soil in the surrounding fields; dredged sediment was considered to have value as soil replacement but not as fertiliser. Overall, small field wetlands can make a valuable contribution to keeping soil out of rivers.

AB - Intensification of agriculture has resulted in increased soil degradation and erosion, with associated pollution of surface waters. Small field wetlands, constructed along runoff pathways, offer one option for slowing down and storing runoff in order to allow more time for sedimentation and for nutrients to be taken up by plants or micro-organisms. This paper describes research to provide quantitative evidence for the effectiveness of small field wetlands in the UK landscape. Ten wetlands were built on four farms in Cumbria and Leicestershire, UK. Annual surveys of sediment and nutrient accumulation in 2010, 2011 and 2012 indicated that most sediment was trapped at a sandy site (70 tonnes over 3 years), compared to a silty site (40 tonnes over 3 years) and a clay site (2 tonnes over 3 years). The timing of rainfall was more important than total annual rainfall for sediment accumulation, with most sediment transported in a few intense rainfall events, especially when these coincided with bare soil or poor crop cover. Nutrient concentration within sediments was inversely related to median particle size, but the total mass of nutrients trapped was dependent on the total mass of sediment trapped. Ratios of nutrient elements in the wetland sediments were consistent between sites, despite different catchment characteristics across the individual wetlands. The nutrient value of sediment collected from the wetlands was similar to that of soil in the surrounding fields; dredged sediment was considered to have value as soil replacement but not as fertiliser. Overall, small field wetlands can make a valuable contribution to keeping soil out of rivers.

KW - Constructed wetlands

KW - Soil degradation

KW - Soil erosion

KW - Phosphorus

KW - Diffuse pollution

KW - Catchment management

U2 - 10.1016/j.jenvman.2014.01.015

DO - 10.1016/j.jenvman.2014.01.015

M3 - Journal article

VL - 135

SP - 54

EP - 62

JO - Journal of Environmental Management

JF - Journal of Environmental Management

SN - 0301-4797

ER -